1 ... 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 ... 74

The platon crystallographic package - səhifə 62

səhifə62/74
tarix04.12.2017
ölçüsü5.01 Kb.

(    -1     1     0 ) X (     1     0     1 ) = (     1     0     2 )       = 
(    -1    -1     0 )   (  -1/2  -1/2     0 )   (    -1     0     0 )     2.000 
Cell Lattice  a       b       c    alpha   beta  gamma Volume CrystalSystem Laue
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Input   mC  6.626  41.080   6.600  90.00 120.11  90.00   1554   Monoclinic   2/m
Reduced  P  6.600   6.602  20.806  94.59  94.58 119.75    777
Convent oF 41.080  11.419   6.626  90.02  90.00  90.00   3108 Orthorhombic   mmm
:: Cell Angles differ 0.02 Deg. from (90/120)
          Conventional, New or Pseudo Symmetry
================================================================================
Space Group Fdd2                   No:  43, Laue:  mmm [Hall:  F 2 -2d         ]
Lattice Type oF, Acentric, Orthorhombic, Order  16( 4) [Shoenflies: C2v^19     ]
CHIRAL  - See P.G. Jones, Acta Cryst. (1986), A42, 57.
  Nr            ***** Symmetry Operation(s) *****
   1               X ,              Y ,              Z               
   2             - X ,            - Y ,              Z               
   3         3/4 - X ,        3/4 + Y ,        1/4 + Z               
   4         1/4 + X ,        1/4 - Y ,        1/4 + Z               
   5               X ,        1/2 + Y ,        1/2 + Z               
   6             - X ,        1/2 - Y ,        1/2 + Z               
   7         3/4 - X ,        1/4 + Y ,        3/4 + Z               
   8         1/4 + X ,        3/4 - Y ,        3/4 + Z               
   9         1/2 + X ,              Y ,        1/2 + Z               
  10         1/2 - X ,            - Y ,        1/2 + Z               
  11         1/4 - X ,        3/4 + Y ,        3/4 + Z               
  12         3/4 + X ,        1/4 - Y ,        3/4 + Z               
  13         1/2 + X ,        1/2 + Y ,              Z               
  14         1/2 - X ,        1/2 - Y ,              Z               
  15         1/4 - X ,        1/4 + Y ,        1/4 + Z               
  16         3/4 + X ,        3/4 - Y ,        1/4 + Z               
:: Origin shifted to:-0.125, 0.269, 0.000 after transformation
:: * Symmetry Elements preceded by an Asterisk are New and indicate
:: Missed/Pseudosymmetry Summary
:: M/P CcToFdd2  Cc   (Anonymous ExamC => oF 0.000 0.02 0.026 100% Fdd2
:: note: glide plane codes are with reference  to input cell !!
:: An SPF-style file is written to be used for the cell transformation.
:: Change of Crystal System indicated. (Maxdev. =  0.026 Ang.)

Chapter 5  - VOID and SQUEEZE Calculations 


5.1 - Introduction


Crystal structures frequently include solvents of crystallization filling voids in the packing 
pattern of the molecule of interest. Often crystals can be obtained only after multiple 
crystallization attempts from many different solvents and solvent mixtures. The successful 
solvent has obviously just the spacial and interaction characteristics to fill the the void. In 
chemical crystallography solvents often occupy voids at special positions such as n-fold 
axes, mirror planes and their combinations. Those symmetry elements are poor 'packers' as 
opposed to twofold screw axes and glide planes which allow close contacts of convex and 
concave regions of the molecules. Voids can have both finite and infinite volumes (e.g. 
channels along n-fold screw axes with n =3, 4 or 6). Since the site symmetry of finite voids 
is often higher than the symmetry of the solvent molecules the result will be disorder. 
Similarly, the stacking of solvent molecules in infinite channels will usually be 
incommensurate with the translation period of the ordered part of the structure, resulting in 
ridges of constant density. Our interest in solvent accessible voids in a crystal structure 
stems from a problem that we encountered with the refinement of the crystal structure of the 
drug Salazopyrin that appeared to include such continuous solvent channels (van der Sluis 
& Spek, 1990a). The residual electron density in those channels (shown in 

Fig. 5.1-1

) could 
not be modeled satisfactorily with a disorder model. The difference Fourier map showed no 
isolated peaks but rather a continuous density tube filled with unknown solvent. After 
having surmounted the problems to obtain suitable crystals for data collection we got 
subsequently stuck with an unsatisfactorily high and un-publishable R-value. This problem 
was the start of the development of a technique now named SQUEEZE and available in the 
program package PLATON. A description of a prototype implementation of the current 
method, at that time named BYPASS, can be found in van der Sluis & Spek (1990b). The 
underlying concept of SQUEEZE is to split the total scattering factor F
H
(calc) into two 
contributions: the contribution of the ordered part F
H
(Model) and the contribution of the 
disordered solvent F
H
(solvent). The latter contribution is obtained by back-Fourier 
transformation of the electron density that is found in the solvent region in the difference 
Fourier map. This recovery procedure is repeated until conversion is reached. 
Judging from the number of structures that are flagged in the CSD for the fact that 
SQUEEZE was used it can be estimated that the procedure was used at least 1000 times and 
probably many more.
  

 


Fig. 5.1-1. 

Views down and perpendicular to the solvent accessible channels (green) in the  
crystal structure of the drug Salazopyrin.

5.2 - The Algorithm


All structures contain void space in small regions and cusps between atoms. In the order of 
35% of the space in a crystal structure lies outside the van der Waals volume of the atoms in 
the structure. In the current context, we are not interested in those voids but rather in voids 
that can at least accommodate a sphere with minimum radius R(min). A good default choice 
for R(min) = 1.2 Angstrom, being the van der Waals radius of the hydrogen atom. Most 
structures exhibit no voids in the last sense. 
In this section, we will first give an ‘analog’ graphical introduction to the concept of 
‘solvent accessible volume’ and then more details on its numerical implementation.

5.2.1 - The analog model


Solvent accessible voids are determined in three steps as illustrated in 

Fig 5.2.1-1.


Step #1: A van der Waals radius is assigned to all atoms in the unit cell. In this way, we have 
divided the total volume V into two parts: V(inside) and V(outside). Note that as a 
byproduct, we can determine the so called Kitajgorodskii packing index (Kitaigorodskii, 
1961) defined as: Packing Index = V(inside) / V.

:

afs
afs -> Meningoensefalit, meningoensefalit
afs -> Nb deze bovenstaande tekst wel weghalen!
afs -> Allergen Checklist for Food Suppliers or Manufacturers


Dostları ilə paylaş:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-schools-white-paper---82.html

the-schools-white-paper---87.html

the-schools-white-paper---91.html

the-schools-white-paper---96.html

the-schools-white-paper.html