1 ... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 8

bet8/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
ahler case it is 2π times
the integral of the scalar curvature. Now we have
Theorem
5.1. If (M, ω) is a compact symplectic 4-manifold and c
1
.[ω] > 0 then
M is diffeomorphic to a blow-up of M
0
, where M
0
is either the complex projective
plane CP
2
of an S
2
bundle over a surface.
This result is due to Li and Liu [32], building on earlier work of Gromov,
Taubes, McDuff and others. A more precise version of the theorem gives a com-
plete description of the possible symplectic forms, up to symplectomorphism. For
simplicity let us consider the case when we know that M is homotopy equivalent
to CP
2
, which was considered by Gromov in his renowned paper [20]. We have
a generator h of H
2
(M, Z) which we choose so that h.ω > 0. Standard algebraic
topology shows that in this situation c
1
.h =
±3 and the positivity hypothesis means
that c
1
.h = 3. Now Gromov chooses an almost-complex structure compatible with
ω. Suppose we know that h is represented by an embedded holomorphic curve Σ.
Then standard algebraic topology (the adjunction formula) shows that Σ is a 2-
sphere. Fix a point p on Σ and consider the deformations of Σ among holomorphic
curves passing through p. The fact that the self-intersection number of Σ is 1 shows
that there is a 2 (real) parameter family of such curves, and further that there is
a unique curve with prescribed complex tangent line at p. The latter deduction
uses Gromov’s compactness theorem for holomorphic curves: since Σ represents a
generator of homology there is no way that curves in the family can break up into
unions of curves, or develop singularities. In a similar way, it follows that for each
point q = p there is a unique holomorphic curve Σ
q
in the family passing through q.
So we get a map π : CP
2
\ {p} → S
2
which takes a point q to the tangent line at p
of Σ
q
. Of course in the model case where we have the standard complex structure
on CP
2
the curves are just the projective lines through the fixed point p. Now
given the map π, which has a standard model in a punctured neighbourhod of p, it

INVARIANTS OF MANIFOLDS AND THE CLASSIFICATION PROBLEM
57
is easy to deduce that M is diffeomorphic to CP
2
, and in fact that the symplectic
form is equivalent to a multiple of the standard one.
The general case is handled in a similar fashion, assuming that one can find
a holomorphic sphere in M with non-negative self-intersection. Thus the essential
problem is how to find such holomorphic spheres. This is where Taubes’ relation
[43] between the Seiberg–Witten equations and holomorphic curves enters in a
crucial way. One of Taubes’ main results is that for a compact symplectic 4-manifold
(N, ω) with b
+
(N ) > 1 the Poincar´
e dual of
−c
1
(N ) is represented by a holomorphic
curve. This is obtained by deforming the Seiberg–Witten equations in a 1-parameter
family, from an equation which has a trivial solution to an equation whose solution
is localised in a certain sense around a holomorphic curve. This result does not
immediately apply to the case at hand—for example a homotopy CP
2
has b
+
= 1—
so a more sophisticated version is needed, involving “wall-crossing” formulae. But
the upshot is that Taubes’ theory provides the holomorphic spheres required to
“sweep out” the 4-manifold. (There is a slightly different approach, using less
analysis, to some of Taubes’ results in [12])
The general scheme of the proof of Theorem 5.1 can be summarised by:
Symplectic
hypothesis

Seiberg–Witten
information

holomorphic
curves

Classification
(ruling)
One can perhaps think (loosely) of the construction of the diffeomorphisms—
sweeping out the manifold by a family of 2-spheres through a point—as a mixture
of the two constructions discussed in Section 2: the Riemannian geometry con-
struction, sweeping out a manifold by geodesics through a point, and the Riemann
mapping construction (since the holomorphic curve condition is a version of the
Cauchy-Riemann equations).
In the case of K¨
ahler surfaces the the division into three cases c
1
.ω = +, 0,
− is
closely related to the division by Kodaira dimension, with c
1
.ω > 0 corresponding
roughly to Kodaira dimension
−∞: i.e., rational and ruled surfaces. Many of
the arguments above can be viewed as an extension to the symplectic case of the
algebro-geometric classification theory for surfaces of Kodaira dimension
−∞. Of
course one would like to go further. An interesting question is to ask what are the
simply-connected compact symplectic 4-manifolds M with c
1
(M ) = 0. The natural
conjecture is that they should all be equivalent to K3 surfaces (with standard
symplectic forms). Morgan and Szabo showed that M must be homeomorphic to
a K3 surface [35], and it is known that it must have the same Seiberg–Witten
invariants but it seems hard to go further.
An issue to ponder is: what are the good questions in 4-manifold theory? It
is well-known that it is not reasonable to ask for a complete classification of com-
pact 4-manifold, because that would involve a complete classification of finitely
presented groups (appearing as the fundamental groups). The abundance of exam-
ples suggests that it may not be reasonable to try to classify all simply connected
smooth 4-manifolds. The classification of symplectic 4-manifolds with c
1
.ω > 0 is
an example of a “good question”, with a complete solution. The classification of
symplectic 4-manifolds with c
1
= 0 may perhaps be a “good question” in this sense,
even though the problem seems out of reach at the moment.

58
S. K. DONALDSON
5.3. Three and Four dimensions. There has been some decisive progress
in the last 5 years on the borderline between 3 and 4 dimensional topology. A
central result is
Theorem
5.2. Let N be a closed oriented 3-manifold. The product N
× S
1
admits a symplectic structure if and only if N fibres over the circle.
In one direction—the construction of a symplectic form given a fibration—
the argument is elementary and goes back to a note of Thurston [44]. The hard
part is the converse and different, but related, proofs have been found by different
groups of workers. The first proof was given by Friedl and Vidussi [18] and uses
a considerable amount of 3-manifold topology. Let f : N
→ S
1
be a smooth map
and Σ = f
−1
(θ)
⊂ N for some generic θ, so Σ is a smooth surface. Let N
0
be
the complement of a tubular neighbourhood of Σ: this is a 3-manifold with two
boundary components i
+
(Σ), i

(Σ). A 1961 theorem of Stallings gives a criterion
in terms of fundamental groups under which f can be deformed to a fibration:
under suitable hypotheses on Σ we need i
±
to induce isomorphisms from π
1
(Σ) to
π
1
(N
0
). Roughly speaking, the argument of Friedl and Vidussi is to obtain this
kind of homotopy information from homology data which in turn is supplied, in
the case when N
× S
1
has a symplectic structure, from Seiberg–Witten theory.
For each homotopy class of maps from N to S
1
there is a classical invariant, the
Alexander polynomial Δ. Friedl and Vidussi consider a generalisation Δ
α
of this
depending on a homomorphism α from π
1
(N ) to a finite group. The central result
in their argument is that the homotopy class is represented by a fibration if and
only if for every α the degree of Δ
α
is given by a certain explicit formula. When
N
×S
1
is symplectic this degree formula follows from a Seiberg–Witten argument of
Kronheimer, depending on Taubes’ work. The other half of the proof, showing that
this degree formula is a sufficient condition for the existence of a fibration is pure
3-manifold theory. The strategy is to reduce to the case when π
1
(N ) is “residually
finite soluble”; a strategy related to a result of Thurston that the fundamental group
of any 3-manifold is residually finite. At a crucial point the argument uses deep
and recent results of Agol [1] in 3-manifold theory. An important part is played by
the “Thurston norm” on the homology of a 3-manifold, which is well-known to be
related to the Alexander polynomial.
Another proof was given soon after by a combination of work of Kutluhan and
Taubes, Kronheimer and Mrowka and Ni. This goes back to fundamental advances
of Ghiggini[19], Ni [37] and Juhasz [23] who gave necessary and sufficient conditions
for the complement of a knot in S
3
to be fibred in terms of Ozsvath and Szabo’s
“knot Floer homology”.
In [28], Kronheimer and Mrowka prove an analogous
result for general fibred 3-manifolds in terms of a version of the Seiberg–Witten
Floer theory attached to the manifold. A crucial ingredient in these arguments is
Gabai’s theory of sutured manifolds and taught foliations. Comparing with the
first proof; the Alexander polynomial is related to the simplest Seiberg–Witten
invariant of a 3-manifolds which is, roughly speaking, the Euler characterstic of the
more refined Seiberg–Witten Floer theory. Thus the second proof builds in more
refined Seiberg–Witten information, but the problem is to show that if N
× S
1
admits a symplectic structure then the Seiberg–Witten Floer homology of N does
have the appropriate structure. This was accomplished by Kutluhan and Taubes
in [30]. The techniques are related to those developed by Taubes in his proof of
the Weinstein conjecture for 3-manifolds.

INVARIANTS OF MANIFOLDS AND THE CLASSIFICATION PROBLEM
59
The general line of these arguments can be indicated by
Symplectic
hypothesis

Seiberg–Witten
information

Alexander polynomial
Thurston norm
sutured/foliated structures

Construction of
fibration
An open problem in a similar vein is whether the Fintushel-Stern homotopy K3
surface M
K
, obtained from a knot K, is symplectic if and only if the knot K is
fibred.
5.4. Khovanov homology and instanton Floer theory. In recent work
Kronheimer and Mrowka [29] prove that “Khovanov homology detects the unknot”–
that is a knot K
⊂ S
3
is trivial if and only if it has the same Khovanov homology as
the trivial knot. We recall the bare outline of the definition of Khovanov homology.
This starts from a generic plane projection of a knot K with l crossings. At each
crossing we can consider two local modifications, patterned on the hyperbolae xy =
± for small . Such a modification will in general define a link. So we get 2
l
links,
indexed by the subsets of
{1, . . . , l} (after fixing some choices). If π is such a subset
the corresponding link K
π
is a trivial link with some number N (π) of components.
Now Khovanov defines a vector space V
π
(over some fixed field) with one basis
element for each component and sets
C

=
π
Λ

V
π
.
There is an elementary, combinatorial, way to define a differential ∂ : C

→ C

making (C

, ∂) a chain complex and the Khovanov homology is defined to be its
homology. In fact C

has a bi-grading, so the Khovanov homology groups are bi-
graded. Of course the striking thing is that this homology is actually independent
of the plane projection but, given a choice of projection, the definition is in principle
completely straightforward–for example to implement on a computer (although in
practice the calculations soon become very large, as in [17]). So a consequence of
these results is a linear algebra algorithms for detecting, from a knot projection,
whether a knot is trivial. Another, earlier, route to the same end is provided by
knot Floer homology and the result of Oszvath and Szabo [38] showing that knot
Floer homology detects the unknot, together with work of Manoescu, Oszvath and
Szabo [34] establishing that knot Floer homology can be computed algorithmically.
Parts of the Kronheimer and Mrowka argument follow similar arguments of
Ozsvath and Szabo [39] for the Heegard Floer homology of a branched cover. In
these arguments the Khovanov homology appears as a kind of universal construction
for theories which obey a “skein relation”. Suppose we have some theory which
assigns to each link L in the 3-sphere a graded vector space I

(L). Represent the
link by a plane projection and make two other links L
0
, L
1
by changing a crossing
as above. Then by a skein relation we mean an exact triangle
· · · → I

(L
0
)
→ I

(L)
→ I

(L
1
)
→ I

(L
0
)
→ . . . ,
(where we ignore grading shift) with suitable naturality properties. To give an
indication of the main idea, imagine (very imprecisely) that the knowledge of two
terms in an exact triangle determines the third. Then for any knot K we could
successively undo all the crossing and conclude that I

(K) is determined by the
I

(K
π
) for the 2
l
choices of π. Suppose further that the theory obeys a “K¨
unneth

60
S. K. DONALDSON
formula”; that if L, L are widely-separated links then
I

(L
∪ L ) = I

(L)
⊗ I

(L ).
Each K
π
is a trivial link, determined solely by the number N (π) of its components
and repeated application of the K¨
unneth formula shows that I

(K
π
) is the tensor
product of N (π) copies of I

(U ) where U is the trivial knot. Suppose finally that
I

(U ) is 2-dimensional with a preferred basis (1, e). Then I

(K
π
) can be iden-
tified with V
π
: that is to say it has a basis made up of expressions e
i
1
e
i
2
. . . e
i
p
where i
1
, . . . i
p
label components of K
π
. We conclude that under these hypotheses
π
I

(K
π
) can be identified with the Kohovanov chain group C

. Of course in
reality two terms of an exact triangle do not determine the third: the homomomor-
phisms of the triangle contain extra information and keeping track of all this data
one expects that the true statement is that there is a spectral sequence with E
2
term
the Khovanov homology of K and converging to I

(K). A more familiar analogy
is the Atiyah-Hirzebruch spectral sequence for generalised cohomology theories. If
K

is such a theory and X
ν
are the skeleta of a CW-complex X then we have exact
triangles
· · · → K

(X
ν
)
→ K

(X
ν
−1
)
→ K

(X
ν
, X
ν
−1
) . . . .
Our first, very imprecise, approximation would say that
K

(X
ν
) is determined by
K

(X
ν
−1
) and the relative cohomology
K

(X
ν
, X
ν
−1
). By excision and suspension
the latter is the cellular cochain group for ordinary cohomology with co-efficients
K

(S
0
) and of course the precise statement is that there is a spectral sequence with
E
2
term H

(X,
K

(S
0
)) converging to
K

(X). Set in this analogy, the Khovanov
homology for link invariants plays the role of ordinary cohomology of spaces.
The theory I

(L) to which Kronheimer and Mrowka apply these ideas is a
variant of the instanton Floer homology for 3-manifolds utilising connections with
singularities along the link. This is closely related to a theory considered by Floer
in work—never properly written up—from around about 1990, which one can now
see was far ahead of its time [16]. Many of these ideas: the skein relation, the

unneth formula and the “resolution” of a knot by undoing all crossings can be
found in Floer’s work. The ideas are also related to the work of Kronhimer and
Mrowka in proving that all knots have “Property P”[27]. In the case at hand, their
strategy is to show that there is a spectral sequence from the Khovanov homology
to their instanton theory I

(K) and then to use independent arguments to show
that for a non-trivial knot K, I

(K) is in a certain sense non-trivial.
5.5. The Volume conjecture and complexification. In 2001 H. and J.
Murakami [36] (building on work of Kashaev [24]) proposed a “volume conjecture”
which connects the theory of the Jones polynomial with hyperbolic structures and
Thurston’s Geometrisation programme. In its simplest form the conjecture consid-
ers a knot K
⊂ S
3
whose complement admits a complete, finite-volume, hyperbolic
structure and predicts that as N
→ ∞
J
N
(K, e
2πi/N
)
J
N
(K
0
, e
2πi/N
)
∼ exp
N

Vol(S
3
\ K) .
Here J
N
are versions of the Jones polynomial and K
0
is the trivial knot. In fact
the numerator and denominator on the left hand side both vanish so the expression
is understood by taking a limit of J
N
( , q) as q tends to e
2πi/N
. This equation has

INVARIANTS OF MANIFOLDS AND THE CLASSIFICATION PROBLEM
61
been verified in many cases. In Witten’s Quantum Field Theory interpretation of
the Jones theory
J
N
(K, e
2πi/k
) =
e
ikCS(A)
Tr
V
Hol(K, A)
DA.
This is a functional integral over the space of connections A on an SU (2) bundle
over S
3
. The quantity CS(A) is the Chern-Simons invariant of a connection A;
Hol(K, A) denotes the holonomy of a connection around K and Tr
V
denotes the
trace in the N -dimensional irreducible representation V of SU (2). Inserting the
holonomy term has the effect that we are really considering connections with a
singularity along K, just as in the work of Kronheimer and Mrowka in the previous
subsection. Of course the Jones polynomial has alternative rigorous mathematical
definitions, so the volume conjecture is a precise mathematical statement. However,
as explained by Gukov [21] the Quantum Field Theory interpretation gives a lot
of insight into why such a formula should hold. In Witten’s original paper [46] he
explained why certain asymptotics as k
→ ∞ of these invariants could be derived
in terms of flat SU (2) connections, applying the principle of stationary phase to
the oscillatory integral. The case at hand is different but the hyperbolic structure
can be regarded as a flat SL(2, C) connection over the knot complement and the
hyperbolic volume naturally appears as 2π times the imaginary part of the Chern-
Simons invariant of this connection. Thus, when the theory is complexified to
consider the space of all SL(2, C) connections, the conjecture appears as a relation
between the asymptotics of integrals over the real locus and in a neighbourhood of
a particular complex critical point. Witten has recently given a very comprehensive
discussion of the issues which arise [47].
The complexification appearing here, replacing the compact gauge group SU (2)
by its complexification SL(2, C) and studying Chern-Simons Theory on a fixed 3-
manifold, is related to another kind of complexification in which the 3-manifold
is replaced by a Calabi-Yau 3-fold. An example of the latter arises in Thomas’
theory of “holomorphic Casson invariants”, which “count” holomorphic bundles
over Calabi-Yau 3-folds [43]. This has been a very active topic in string theory,
and it is quite possible that relations with these ideas around the volume conjecture
will emerge in the future.
References
1. I. Agol Criteria for virtual fibering Jour. Topology 1 (2008) 269-284
MR2399130
(2009b:57033)
2. A. Akhmedov and B. D. Park Exotic smooth structures on small 4-manifolds with odd signa-
tures Inventiones Math. 181 (2010) 577-603 MR2660453 (2012b:57048)
3. M. F. Atiyah Topological Field Theories I.H.E.S Sci. Publ. Math. 68 (1988) 175-186
MR1001453 (90e:57059)
4. M. F. Atiyah, N. J. Hitchin and I. M. Singer Self-duality in four-dimensional Riemannian
geometry Proc. Roy. Soc. London A 362 (1978) 425-461 MR506229 (80d:53023)
5. D. Auroux The canonical pencils on Horikawa surfaces Geometry and Topology 10 (2006)
2173-2217 MR2284054 (2007m:14065)
6. S. Bauer and M. Furuta A stable cohomotopy refinement of Seiberg–Witten invariants, I
Inventiones Math. 155 (2004) No.1. 1-19 MR2025298 (2005c:57040)
7. F. Catanese and B. Wajnryb Diffeomorphisms of simply connected algebraic surfaces Jour.
Diff. Geometry 76 (2007) No. 2 177-213 MR2330412 (2008c:14057)

62
S. K. DONALDSON
8. F. Catanese , M. L¨
onne and B. Wajnryb Moduli spaces of surfaces and monodromy invari-
ants Proc. Gokova Geometry and Topology Conf. 2009 58-98 Int. Press 2010 MR2655304
(2011g:14085)
9. X-X Chen, C. LeBrun and B. Weber On conformally K¨
ahler Einstein manifolds Jour. Amer.
Math. Soc. 21 (2008) No. 4 1137-1168 MR2425183 (2010h:53054)
10. S. Donaldson Irrationality and the h-cobordism conjecture Jour. Diff. Geom. 26 (1987) No. 1
141-168 MR892034 (88j:57035)
11. S. Donaldson Two-forms on four-manifolds and elliptic equations In: inspired by S-S Chern
Nankai Tracts in Mathemetics 11 153-172 World Scientific 2006 MR2313334 (2008c:53090)
12. S. Donaldson and I. Smith Lefschetz pencils and the canonical class for symplectic four-
manifolds Topology 42 (2003) 743-785 MR1958528 (2004c:53142)
13. R. Fintushel and R. Stern Rational blow-downs of smooth 4-manifolds Jour. Diff. Geom. 46
(1997) 181-235 MR1484044 (98j:57047)
14. R. Fintushel and R. Stern Knots, links and 4-manifolds Inventiones Math. (1998) No. 2 363-
400 MR1650308 (99j:57033)
15. R. Fintushel and R. Stern Pinwheels and nullhomologous surgery on 4-manifolds with b
+
= 1
Algebraic and Geometric Topology 11 (2011) 1649-1699 MR2821436 (2012i:57043)
16. A. Floer Instanton homology, surgery and knots In: Geometry of low dimensional manifolds
Vol 1, Cambridge UP 1990 97-114 MR1171893 (93h:57049)
17. M. Freedman, R. Gompf, S. Morrison and K. Walker Man and machine thinking about the
smooth four-dimensional Poincar´
e conjecture Quantum Topology 1 (2010) No. 2 171-208
MR2657647 (2011f:57061)
18. S. Friedl and S. Vidussi Twisted Alexander polynomials and fibred 3-manifolds arxiv 1001.0132
MR2768657 (2012j:57028)
19. P. Ghiggini Knot Floer homology detects genus-one fibred knots Amer. J. Math. 130 (2008)
No. 5 1151-1169 MR2450204 (2010f:57013)
20. M. Gromov Pseudoholomorphic curves in symplectic manifolds Inventiones Math. 82 (1985)
No. 2 307-347 MR809718 (87j:53053)
21. S. Gukov Three-dimensional quantum gravity, Chern-Simons Theory and the A-polynomial
Commun. Math. Phys. 255 (2005) 577-627 MR2134725 (2006f:58029)
22. R. Hamilton The formation of singularities in the Ricci flow Surveys in Differential Geometry
II International Press 1995 7-136 MR1375255 (97e:53075)
23. A. Juhasz Floer homology and surface decompositions Geometry and Topology 12 No.1 (2008)
299-350 MR2390347 (2009a:57021)
24. R. Kashaev The hyperbolic volume of knots from quantum dilogarithms Letters in Math. Phys.
39 1997 No. 3 269-275 MR1434238 (98b:57012)
25. M. Khovanov A categorification of the Jones polynomial Duke Math. J. 101 (2000) no. 3
359-426 MR1740682 (2002j:57025)
26. D. Kotschick On manifolds homeomorphic to CP
2
8CP
2
Inventiones Math. 95 (1989) No. 3
591-600 MR979367 (90a:57047)
27. P. B. Kronheimer and T. S. Mrowka Witten’s conjecture and Property P Geometry and Topol-
ogy 8 (2004) 295-310 MR2023280 (2004m:57023)
28. P. B. Kronheimer and T. S. Mrowka Knots, sutures and excision Jour. Differential Geometry
84 (2010) 301-364 MR2652464 (2012m:57059)
29. P. B. Kronheimer and T. S. Mrowka Khovanov homology is an unknot detector Pub. Math.
Inst. Hautes Etudes Sc. 113 (2011) 97-208 MR2805599
30. C. Kutluhan and C. H. Taubes Seiberg–Witten Floer homology and symplectic forms on
S
1
× M
3
Geometry and Topology 13 2009 493-525 MR2469523 (2010h:57044)
31. Y. Lee and J. Park A simply connected surface of general type with p
g
= 0, K
2
= 2 Inventiones
Math. 170 (2007) No. 3 483-505 MR2357500 (2008m:14076)
32. T J Li and A Liu General wall-crossing formula Math. Res. Letters 2 1995 797-810 MR1362971
(96m:57053)
33. J. Lurie On the classification of topological field theories Current developments in mathematics
2008 128-280 Int. Press. 2009 MR2555928 (2010k:57064)
34. C. Manolescu, P. Oszvath, S. Sarkar A combinatorial description of knot Floer homology
Annals of Math. Ser. 2 169 (2008) 633-660 MR2480614 (2009k:57047)
35. J. Morgan and Z. Szabo Homotopy K3 surfaces and mod 2 Seiberg–Witten invariants math.
Res. Letters 4 (1997) No. 1 17-21 MR1432806 (97k:57041)

INVARIANTS OF MANIFOLDS AND THE CLASSIFICATION PROBLEM
63
36. H. Murakami and J. Murakami The coloured Jones polynomial and the simplicial volume of
a knot Acta Math. 186 (2001) No. 1 85-104 MR1828373 (2002b:57005)
37. Y. Ni Knot Floer homology detects fibred knots Inventiones Math. 170 (2007) No. 3 577-608
MR2357503 (2008j:57053)
38. P. Oszvath and Z. Szabo Holomorphic disks and genus bounds Geometry and Topology 8
(2004) 311-344 MR2023281 (2004m:57024)
39. P. Ozsvath and Z. Szabo On the Heegard Floer homology of branched double covers Advances
in Math. 194 (2005) 1-33 MR2141852 (2006e:57041)
40. J. Park Simply connected symplectic 4-manifolds with b
+
2
= 1, c
2
1
= 2 Inventiones Math. 159
(2005) 657-667 MR2125736 (2006c:57024)
41. P. Seidel and I. Smith A link invariant from the symplectic geometry of the nilpotent slice
Duke Math. Jour. 134 (2006) No. 3 453-514 MR2254624 (2007f:53118)
42. C. H. Taubes SW
⇒ Gr: from the Seiberg–Witten equations to pseudoholomorphic curves
Jour. Amer. Math. Soc. 9 (1996) 845-918 MR1362874 (97a:57033)
43. R. Thomas A holomorphic Casson invariant for Calabi-Yau 3-folds and bundles on K3 fibra-
tions Jour. Diff. Geom. 54 (2000) No. 2 367-438 MR1818182 (2002b:14049)
44. W. Thurston Some simple examples of symplectic manifolds Proc. Amer. That. Soc. 55 (1976)
No. 2 467-468 MR0402764 (53:6578)
45. C. Wall Geometric structures on compact complex analytic surfaces Topology 25 (1986) No.
2 119-153 MR837617 (88d:32038)
46. E. Witten Quantum Field Theory and the Jones polynomial Commun Math Phys. 121 (1989)
351-399 MR990772 (90h:57009)
47. E. Witten Analytic continuation of Chern-Simons theory In: Chern-Simons Gauge theories:
20 years after 347-446 AMS/IP Studies Adv. Math. 50 Amer. Math Soc 2011 MR2809462
(2012i:81252)
48. E. Witten Fivebranes and knots Quantum Topology 3 (2012) 1-137 MR2852941
Imperial College, London

Clay Mathematics Proceedings
Volume 19, 2014
Volumes of Hyperbolic 3-Manifolds
David Gabai, Robert Meyerhoff, and Peter Milley
Abstract.
We discuss the recent proof that the Weeks manifold is the unique
lowest volume closed hyperbolic 3-manifold; in particular the role of Perelman’s
work (after Agol, Dunfield, Storm & Thurston) in the argument.
Introduction
This paper is based on the first author’s lecture at the 2010 Clay Research
Conference held in Paris. That conference celebrated the proof by Grisha Perelman
of both the Poincar´
e conjecture and Thurston’s Geometrization conjecture. Not
coincidentally, Poincar´
e, Thurston and Perelman play major roles in the story this
paper tells. Poincar´
e made major contributions to the foundations of hyperbolic
geometry, topology and 3-manifold theory; e.g., he introduced the fundamental
group and showed that PSL(2,
C) = Isom(H
3
). A byproduct of Thurston’s work on
geometrization was his seminal work on volumes that made possible the problem
addressed in this paper of finding the lowest volume closed hyperbolic 3-manifold.
Perelman’s work on Ricci flow (which forms the core of his proof of geometrization)
plays a crucial role in the work of Agol–Dunfield that in turn is needed in the
resolution of the low-volume problem.
Background on cusped hyperbolic surfaces and 3-manifolds is given in sections
1–2. Section 3 recalls Mostow’s rigidity theorem and Thurston’s fundamental result
on volumes. Section 4 states several of the natural problems arising from Thurston’s
theorem, most of which are still open, and the hyperbolic complexity conjecture
of Thurston, Hodgson–Weeks, Matveev–Fomenko. Section 5 states our main result
and some of its history. Section 6 states the log(3)/2 theorem of [GMT] that plays
a crucial role in the proof. Section 7 explains Perelman’s role, after Agol, Dunfield,
Storm and Thurston [ADST]. Sections 8–9 give some of the intuition behind the
main result and some of the formalism needed to make it a proof.
The resolution of the main result was the culmination of a long line of research
spanning 30 years by many authors, much of which is not discussed in this paper.
For a much more detailed outline of the proof, the reader should consult the exposi-
tory paper Mom technology and hyperbolic 3-manifolds [GMM3]. That paper also
The first author was partially supported by NSF grants DMS-0504110 and DMS-1006553.
The second author was partially supported by NSF grants DMS-0553787 and DMS-0204311.
The third author was partially supported by NSF grant DMS-0554624 and ARC Discovery
grant DP0663399.
c 2014 David Gabai, Robert Meyerhoff, and Peter Milley
65

66
DAVID GABAI, ROBERT MEYERHOFF, AND PETER MILLEY
Figure 1.
What surface is this?
provides more information about partial results on the problems stated in section
4, a long list of other problems, and directions for future research.
Unless otherwise stated all manifolds in this paper are orientable and connected.
1. Hyperbolic surfaces
The well-known classification of surfaces asserts that any closed surface is home-
omorphic to a surface of genus
≥ 0. If S is a closed surface of genus g, then
χ(S) = 2
− 2g, thus the topology of a closed surface is determined by its Euler
characteristic. For compact surfaces we have the following classification theorem.
Theorem
1.1. Let S be a compact connected surface, then S is homeomorphic
to S
g,p
, the surface of genus g with p open discs [with disjoint closures] removed.
Furthermore two compact connected surfaces S and T are homeomorphic if and
only if
1) χ(S) = χ(T ) and
2)
|∂S| = |∂T |, where |X| denotes the number of components of X.
Thus the topology of a compact surface is determined by two easily computed
invariants. Part of the beauty of topology lies in the fact that homeomorphic spaces
are not always obviously homeomorphic. See Figure 1.
The interior of a compact surface S supports a complete finite-volume hyper-
bolic metric, i.e. a metric of constant -1 curvature, if and only if χ(S) < 0. The
remarkable Gauss–Bonnet theorem asserts that for complete finite-volume hyper-
bolic surfaces: Euler characteristic, a combinatorial invariant, is a linear function
of area, a geometric invariant.
Theorem
1.2 (Gauss–Bonnet). If S is a complete finite-volume hyperbolic sur-
face, then area(S) =
−2πχ(S).
This immediately follows from the general Gauss–Bonnet theorem
S
KdA = 2πχ(S)
after taking K =
−1.
Thus area is an excellent, though not complete, measure of topological com-
plexity of a hyperbolic surface. At most finitely many such surfaces have the same
area.
Figure 2 shows how to explicitly construct a finite-volume hyperbolic metric
on the punctured torus S. Start with the regular ideal 4-gon in the hyperbolic
plane and then glue opposite edges by an isometry. For each pair of edges there is
an
R-parameter of choices that produces an orientable surface. Choose the unique

VOLUMES OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS
67
Figure
2.
Symmetrically identify opposite edges to obtain the
cusped punctured torus S
gluing that takes the pair of nearest points to each other. The resulting complete
finite-volume hyperbolic surface will have a cusp, that is, a subset homeomorphic
to S
1
× [1, ∞) and isometric to R × [1, ∞)/f, where R × [1, ∞) ⊂ H
2
,
H
2
denotes
the upper-half-space model of hyperbolic 2-space, and f (x, y) = (x + d, y) for some
d > 0.
We can choose the cusp to be maximal, i.e., so that its interior is embedded
and its boundary is tangent to itself. The preimage of a cusp in
H
2
is a union
of horoballs. Figure 3 shows some of the preimage horoballs of the maximal cusp
of S, viewed in the upper-half-space model. It also shows 4 fundamental domains
and all the horoballs that intersect them. A calculation shows that a fundamental
domain for the maximal cusp is [0, 4

2]
× [1, ∞) and that area(maximal cusp) =
4

2. Also Gauss–Bonnet implies that area(S) = 2π. It follows that the ratio
area(maximal cusp)/area(S) = 0.90..., which is at first glance a strikingly large
ratio. By Boroczky [B], an optimal 2-dimensional horosphere packing has density
3/π.
Figure 3.
A horoball diagram for T showing horoballs at hyper-
bolic distance log(2) from the horoball at infinity. Also shown are
four fundamental domains for T and one fundamental domain for
the cusp.

68
DAVID GABAI, ROBERT MEYERHOFF, AND PETER MILLEY
Figure 4.
Schematic view of a 2-cusped hyperbolic 3-manifold
Figure 5.
m011 horoball diagram showing horoballs at hyperbolic
distance 0.50 from the horoball at infinity and an internal Mom-2
structure. Vol(m011) = 2.718... Vol(maximal cusp) = 2.134...
2. Hyperbolic 3-manifolds
A schematic picture of a 2-cusped hyperbolic 3-manifold appears in figure 4.
It emphasizes that each cusp of a complete finite-volume hyperbolic 3-manifold is
topologically a torus
×[1, ∞).
Analogous to the situation in dimension two, the
preimage of a cusp is a 3-dimensional horoball. If a manifold has a unique cusp,
then it can be expanded to a maximal one. Figure 5 shows a horoball diagram
for the maximal cusp of the 1-cusped hyperbolic 3-manifold m011(in Weeks’ Snap-
Pea notation [We]) in the upper-half-space model of
H
3
. The diagram shows the
projection of various horoballs to the (x, y)
−plane. The horoball at infinity is not
shown in this figure. It consists of the horoball
R×R×[1, ∞). The largest horoballs
have Euclidean diameter 1 and are tangent to the horoball at infinity. Note that
π
1
(cusp) =
Z ⊕ Z and acts on the upper-half-space by Euclidean translations. The
parallelogram is a fundamental domain for this action restricted to the (x,y)-plane.

VOLUMES OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS
69
Note that the cusp takes up over 75% of the volume of the manifold. The various
edges, thick edges and numbers have important significance and will be explained
in future sections.
3. Foundational results on volumes
The following theorem was first proved by Mostow [Mo] in 1968 for closed
manifolds and extended independently by Marden [Ma] (n = 3) and Prasad [Pra]
(n
≥ 3) for complete finite-volume manifolds in 1972.
Theorem
3.1 (Mostow Rigidity). If ρ
0
, ρ
1
are complete finite-volume hyper-
bolic metrics on the n-manifold N , n
≥ 3, then there exists an isometry f : N
ρ
0

N
ρ
1
such that f is homotopic to the identity. Here N
ρ
denotes N with the ρ metric.
The following is an immediate consequence of the Mostow Rigidity and Gauss–
Bonnet theorems.
Corollary
3.2. Volume is a topological invariant of complete finite-volume
hyperbolic manifolds.
Remarks
3.3. Mostow Rigidity does not assert that f is isotopic to the identity.
That f is isotopic to the identity is classical for n = 2, proved by Gabai–Meyerhoff–
N. Thurston for n = 3 [GMT] and false for n > 10 and N closed [FJ]. (Using
Igusa’s stability theorem, rather than a truncated version, that result can be im-
proved, using the same proof, to n > 8 [F].) An assertion related to and stronger
than the Mostow Rigidity for n = 3, the space of hyperbolic metrics is contractible
[G].
The following seminal result of Thurston [Th1], generalizing work of Jorgensen
and Gromov opened the door to many interesting volume problems.
Theorem
3.4 (Thurston 1977). Volumes of complete hyperbolic 3-manifolds
are a well-ordered closed subset of
R of order-type ω
ω
. Only finitely many manifolds
can have the same volume.
Order type ω
ω
means that there is a smallest volume, a next smallest volume,
· · · , then a first limit volume, then a next volume, then a next volume, · · · , then a
second limit volume,
· · · . Eventually, there is a first limit of limit volumes, then a
next volume etc. This is schematically depicted in Figure 6.
Figure 6
In contrast to dimension-3, by Gauss–Bonnet (n = 2) and Wang (1972) [Wa]
(n
≥ 4), the volumes of hyperbolic n-manifolds form a discrete subset of R.
4. Problems on volumes
The following is an immediate corollary of Theorem 3.4.
Theorem
4.1 (Thurston). Any set of hyperbolic 3-manifolds has a minimal
volume element.

70
DAVID GABAI, ROBERT MEYERHOFF, AND PETER MILLEY
This result immediately gave rise to a host of interesting problems, most of
which are still open. See [GMM3] for more information about these and other
such problems.
Problem
4.2. What is/are the hyperbolic 3-manifold(s) of least volume?
Answer
4.3. The Weeks manifold is the unique closed hyperbolic 3-manifold
of least volume [GMM2].
Problem
4.4. What is/are the least volume n-cusped 3-manifold(s)?
Answer
4.5. When n = 1, Chris Cao and Rob Meyerhoff [CM] showed in
2001 that the figure-8 knot complement and its sister are the two least volume
manifolds.
When n = 2, Ian Agol [Ag2] showed in 2010 that the Whitehead link and its
sister are the two least volume manifolds.
The problem is open for n
≥ 3.
Problem
4.6. What is/are the least volume fibered hyperbolic 3-manifold(s)?
Problem
4.7. What is/are the least volume Haken hyperbolic 3-manifolds(s)?
Problem
4.8. What is/are the least volume non-orientable 3-manifold(s)?
The following related problem is a special case of a question of Siegel that
predates Thurston.
Problem
4.9. What is the least volume 3-orbifold?
Answer
4.10. This was solved by Gehring–Martin [GM] and Marshall–Martin
[MM] in two papers culminating a long line of research.
During the period 1978-1987, starting with Thurston, various mathematicians
coming from different points of view made conjectures relating volume and topo-
logical complexity. We packaged them together [GMM1] to offer the following
open-ended conjecture.
Conjecture
4.11. (Hyperbolic Complexity Conjecture) (Thurston, Hodgson–
Weeks, Matveev–Fomenko) Low volume hyperbolic 3-manifolds are obtained by
filling low topological complexity cusped hyperbolic 3-manifolds.
Remark
4.12. Part of the challenge is to find a good measure of topological
complexity and find reasonable notions of low. We believe that the Mom number
[GMM1] recalled here in Definition 8.1 offers a measure of topological complexity
amenable to this conjecture.
5. The Quest for the lowest volume manifold
The Weeks manifold (see Figure 7), also known as the Matveev–Fomenko
manifold, is the closed manifold obtained by (5/1, 5/2) surgery on the White-
head link.
It is known that the Weeks manifold is arithmetic [MR] and that
vol(Weeks)=0.9427... . It was independently conjectured to be the smallest vol-
ume closed manifold around 1984 by Josef Przytcki and Jeffrey Weeks. The former
through his study of punctured torus bundles and the latter through computer
experimentation that evolved into his SnapPea program.

VOLUMES OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS
71
Figure 7.
The Weeks Manifold. Volume(Weeks) = 0.9427....
Theorem
5.1 (Gabai–Meyerhoff–Milley [GMM2]). The Weeks manifold is
the unique lowest volume closed hyperbolic 3-manifold.
The quest for the lowest volume closed 3-manifold has a long history. Part of
that history is captured in Table 1, which lists successive improvements in lower
bounds for vol(smallest). Interestingly the proof of Theorem 5.1 used most of the
techniques needed to establish the partial results of Table 1.
1979
Meyerhoff
0.0006
1986
Meyerhoff
0.0008
1991
Gehring–Martin
0.0010
1996
Gabai–Meyerhoff–N. Thurston
0.16668
1999
Przeworski
0.2766
7/2000
Przeworski
0.2814
10/2000
Marshall–Martin
0.2855
10/2000
Marshall–Martin + Przeworski
0.2903
2001
Agol
0.32
2002
Przeworski
0.33
2005
Agol–Dunfield
0.67
2007
Gabai–Meyerhoff–Milley
0.9427. . .
Table 1.
Historic Lower Bounds for Vol(Smallest)
6. The log(3)/2 theorem
A crucial ingredient in the proof of Theorem 5.1 is the following.
Theorem
6.1 (Gabai–R. Meyerhoff–N. Thurston[GMT]). If γ is a shortest
geodesic in the closed orientable hyperbolic 3-manifold N , then either
1) TubeRadius(γ)
≥ log(3)/2 or
2) vol(N )
≥ 1.10....
Remarks
6.2. The proof was done with rigorous computer assistance. It suf-
ficed to analyze a compact 3-complex-dimensional rectangle in
C
3
. ( The proof of
compactness used a lemma of Meyerhoff’s [Mey] that enabled him to obtain the
first explicit lower bound of 0.0006 for vol(smallest).) The rectangle was chopped
up into about 500,000,000 subboxes. All but 7 of the boxes were eliminated by one
of about 32,000 reasons. The seven boxes contained parameters for covering spaces
of all the thin-tubed manifolds.

72
DAVID GABAI, ROBERT MEYERHOFF, AND PETER MILLEY
The argument relies on the fact that Isom(
H
3
) = P SL(2,
C) (Poincar´e 1883
[Po]) and that the representation of π
1
(N )
→ P SL(2, C) lifts to SL(2, C) (Thurston).
For this reason, the geometry of hyperbolic 3-manifolds is amenable to computer
calculation.
A few years later Champanerkar, Lewis, Lipyanskiy and Meltzer [CLLMR]
showed that each box contains a unique manifold and two of them are isometric.
Thus any thin-tubed manifold is covered by one of six manifolds that are denoted
N
0
,
· · · , N
5
.
Jones and Reid [JR] showed that N
0
(also known as vol3) nontrivially covers
no manifold and Reid [CLLMR] extended this to N
1
and N
5
. Very recently Maria
Trnkova and the first author [GT] have shown that N
2
and N
4
each nontrivially
2-fold cover a manifold and the shortest geodesics of these quotient manifolds have
log(3)/2 tubes. Furthermore, N
2
, N
3
and N
4
nontrivially cover no other mani-
folds and vol3 is the unique closed hyperbolic 3-manifold that does not have some
geodesic with a log(3)/2 tube.
7. The role of Perelman: After Agol, Dunfield, Storm & Thurston
Using Perelman’s work on Ricci flow, Ian Agol and Nathan Dunfield proved
the following result.
Theorem
7.1 (Agol–Dunfield). [ADST] Let N be a closed hyperbolic 3-manifold,
and γ a simple closed geodesic in N of length L and tube radius R. Let V denote a
tube of radius R about γ. Let N
γ
denote N
\ γ with a complete hyperbolic metric.
Then
vol(N
γ
)
≤ (coth(2R))
3
vol(N ) + (π/2)(L tanh(R) tanh(2R))
= coth(2R)
3
vol(N ) + vol(V )sech(2R)
Corollary
7.2. [ADST], [ACS] If N is a minimal volume closed hyperbolic
3-manifold, then N is obtained by filling a 1-cusped hyperbolic 3-manifold of volume
at most 2.848.
Proof.
Let γ be a shortest geodesic in N . Let R denote its tube radius. As
in [ADST] apply Theorem 6.1 to assume that R
≥ log(3)/2 and apply Andrew
Przeworski’s tube-packing estimate [Prez] to assume that vol(V )
≤ .91 vol(N).
Since vol(Weeks)
≤ 0.9428 it follows that
0.9428 > vol(N )
≥ vol(N
γ
)/ coth(log(3))
3
(1 + .91sech(log(3))
and hence vol(N
γ
) < 2.848.
Idea of proof of Theorem 7.1. We outline the argument of [ADST]. Figure 8
shows how to construct a C
0
metric g on N
γ
such that the scalar curvature of g is
≥ −6. The 3-manifold N
γ
with the g metric has volume equal to the right-hand
side of the first inequality of Theorem 7.1. The metric g can be approximated by a
smooth metric also with scalar curvature
≥ −6, along the lines of Bray and Miao
[Br], [Mi]. Apply Perelman’s Ricci flow with surgery to this metric to obtain the
hyperbolic metric on N
γ
. Perelman’s monotonicity formula implies that volume is
monotonically decreasing under the flow, thus Theorem 7.1 follows.
Actually, Perelman’s results require that N
γ
be compact. However, by Thurston’s
filling theorem, N
γ
is the Gromov–Hausdorff limit of the manifolds
{N
γ
(p
i
, q
i
)
}
where N
γ
(p
i
, q
i
) is obtained by filling N
γ
. One can put a metric g
i
on N
γ
(p
i
, q
i
)

VOLUMES OF HYPERBOLIC 3-MANIFOLDS
73
Figure 8
analogous to the metric g, thereby obtaining estimates for vol(N
γ
(p
i
, q
i
)) as in
Theorem 7.1. Since lim
i
→∞
vol(N
γ
(p
i
, q
i
)) = vol(N
γ
) the result follows.
Historical Note The above result is a generalization of an earlier work of Agol [Ag1],
that obtained the lower bound of 0.32 for vol(smallest) in 2001. Instead of using
Perelman, Agol invoked the main result of Boland–Connell–Souto [BCS] that in
turn is the finite-volume version of a fundamental result of Besson–Courtois–Gallot
[BCG]. Besson–Courtois–Gallot showed that the volume of a closed hyperbolic
3-manifold is minimized by the hyperbolic metric among all metrics satisfying a
certain condition on Ricci curvature.
8. Mom technology I
The next two sections discuss our work towards finding the lowest-volume closed
hyperbolic 3-manifold, see [GMM1], [GMM2], and [Mill].
The motivating idea to address Conjecture 4.11 and begin to address Problem
4.2 is as follows. Given a hyperbolic manifold N (cusped or not) of low volume,
we expect to find an embedded compact submanifold M
⊂ N of low topological
complexity such that ∂M is a union of at least two tori and N is obtained by filling
in some of the tori with solid tori and attaching cusps to the others. Such a manifold
is called a Mom manifold to N and may arise as follows. (The reader might want
to stare at Figure 5 before proceeding further.) Suppose that N has exactly one
cusp. Let T denote the boundary of the maximal cusp. Push T slightly into the
cusp so that it is embedded. Expand T to the inside of N . By Morse theory, for
generic times t the expanded T will be a manifold M
t
diffeomorphic to T
× I with
handles attached to the T
×1 side. (As described by Morgan in his lecture, Poincar´e
understood, pre-Morse, the rudiments of this Morse theory. We were motivated by
Smale’s [Sm] spectacular use of this type of idea to prove the Poincar´
e conjecture
in dimensions
≥ 5.) In our setting, since vol(N) is small, the pushed T must rapidly
and repeatedly bump into itself so M
t
should have several 1- and 2-handles for t
small. Experiments with SnapPea suggest that by judiciously choosing a subset
of the 1- and 2-handles we can find a submanifold M with an equal number of 1-
and 2-handles. This suggests that ∂M is a union of tori that in turn cuts off cusps
and solid tori to the outside. Such an M is our desired Mom manifold. Section 9
explains how to find the desired Mom submanifold in the manifold m011.
A major step in the proof of Theorem 5.1 is in carrying out a more sophisticated
version of this procedure for 1-cusped hyperbolic manifolds of volume
≤ 2.848. We

74
DAVID GABAI, ROBERT MEYERHOFF, AND PETER MILLEY
conjecture that a variant of this program can be carried out for closed hyperbolic
3-manifolds to give a much deeper understanding of low volume closed hyperbolic
3-manifolds as well as a Ricci flow free proof of Theorem 5.1. In the closed case
we expect that T can be taken to be the boundary of a (nearly) maximal tube W
about a shortest geodesic and we expect the Mom manifold to live in N
\ int(W ).
Note that in the horoball diagram of m011 (Figure 5) the parallelogram is fairly
small and the big horoballs (i.e., those at hyperbolic distance
≤ 0.5 from the one at
infinity) are packed fairly tightly. Our intuition is that these two phenomena hold
in general for 1-cusped hyperbolic 3-manifolds with vol(N ) small, though with a
somewhat smaller value than 0.5. Indeed, failure of the first property implies that
the volume of the cusp cut off by T is too large and failure of the second implies
that too much volume lies outside (and sometimes inside) the cusp. This relies
on the basic fact that the volume of a cusp V is equal to area(∂V )/2. We also
expect that since vol(N ) is small, most of the volume of N will lie in the maximal
cusp. These three properties are key to finding the Mom manifold within N . Note
that three closely packed horoballs will give rise, using the above construction, to
a valence-3 2-handle. Valence-3 means that each 2-handle runs over the 1-handles
exactly 3 times, counted with multiplicity.
We now formally define our measure of topological complexity. In


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-scientific-and-78.html

the-scientific-and-82.html

the-scientific-and-87.html

the-scientific-and-91.html

the-scientific-and-96.html