1 ... 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 18

bet18/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
2
;
Q) = Q →
⋅d
Q = H
n
(X
1
;
Q).
(The main advantage of the cohomology product over the intersection product on
homology is that the former is preserved by all continuous maps,
f
∗i+j
(c
1
⋅ c
2
) = f
∗i
(c
1
) ⋅ f
∗j
(c
2
)
for all f
∶ X → Y and all c
1
∈ H
i
(Y ), c
2
∈ H
j
(Y ).)
If m
= 1, then (by the full cohomological Poincar´e duality) the above remains
true for all coefficient fields
F; moreover, the induced homomorphism π
i
(X
1
) →
π
i
(X
2
) is surjective as it is seen by looking at the lift of f ∶ X
1
→ X
2
to the induced
map from the covering ˜
X
1
→ X
1
induced by the universal covering ˜
X
2
→ X
2
to ˜
X
2
.
(A map of degree m
> 1 sends π
1
(X
1
) to a subgroup in π
1
(X
2
) of a finite index
dividing m.)
Let us construct manifolds starting from pseudo-manifolds, where a compact
oriented n-dimensional pseudo-manifold is a triangulated n-space X
0
, such that the
following holds.
● Every simplex of dimension < n in X
0
lies in the boundary of an n-simplex,

MANIFOLDS
129
● The complement to the union of the (n − 2)-simplices in X
0
is an oriented
manifold.
Pseudo-manifolds are infinitely easier to construct and to recognize than manifolds:
essentially, these are simplicial complexes with exactly two n-simplices adjacent to
every
(n − 1)-simplex.
There is no comparably simple characterization of triangulated n-manifolds X
where the links L
n
−i−1
= L
Δ
i
⊂ X of the i-simplices must be topological (n − i − 1)-
spheres. But even deciding if π
1
(L
n
−i−1
) = 1 is an unsolvable problem except for a
couple of low dimensions.
Accordingly, it is very hard to produce manifolds by combinatorial construc-
tions; yet, one can “dominate” any pseudo-manifold by a manifold, where, observe,
the notion of degree perfectly applies to oriented pseudo-manifolds.
Theorem.
Let X
0
be a connected oriented n-pseudomanifold. Then there exists
a smooth closed connected oriented manifold X and a continuous map f
∶ X → X
0
of degree m
> 0.
Moreover, given an oriented
R
N
-bundle V
0
→ X
0
, N
≥ 1, one can find an m-
dominating X, which also admits a smooth embedding X
⊂ R
n
+N
, such that our
f
∶ X → X
0
of degree m
> 0 induces the normal bundle of X from V
0
.
Proof.
Since that the first N
−1 homotopy groups of the Thom space of V

of
V
0
vanish (see section 5), Serre’s m-sphericity theorem delivers a map f

∶ S
n
+N

V

a non-zero degree m, provided N
> n. Then the “generic pullback” X of X
0
⊂ V
0
(see section 3) does the job as it was done in Section 5 for Thom’s bordisms.
In general, if 1
≤ N ≤ n, the m-sphericity of the fundamental class [V

] ∈
H
n
+N
(V

) is proven with the Sullivan’s minimal models, see Theorem 24.5 in [19]
The minimal model, of a space X is a free (skew)commutative differential al-
gebra which, in a way, extends the cohomology algebra of X and which faithfully
encodes all homotopy
Q-invariants of X. If X is a smooth N-manifold it can be
seen in terms of “higher linking” in X.
For example, if two cycles C
1
, C
2
⊂ X of codimensions i
1
, i
2
, satisfy C
1
∼ 0 and
C
1
∩ C
2
= 0, then the (first order) linking class between them is an element in the
quotient group H
N
−i
1
−i
2
−1
(X)/(H
N
−i
1
−1
(X)∩[C
2
]) which is defined with a plaque
D
1
∈ ∂
−1
(C
1
), i.e. such that ∂(D
1
) = C
1
, as the image of
[D
1
∩ C
2
] under the
quotient map
H
N
−i
1
−i
2
−1
(X) ∋ [D
1
∩ C
2
] ↦ H
N
−i
1
−i
2
−1
(X)/(H
N
−i
1
−1
(X) ∩ [C
2
]).
Surgery and the Browder-Novikov Theorem. (1962 [8],[54]). Let X
0
be
a smooth closed simply connected oriented n-manifold, n
≥ 5, and V
0
→ X
0
be a
stable vector bundle where “stable” means that N
= rank(V ) >> n. We want to
modify the smooth structure of X
0
keeping its homotopy type unchanged but with
its original normal bundle in
R
n
+N
replaced by V
0
.
There is an obvious algebraic-topological obstruction to this highlighted by
Atiyah in [2] which we call
[V

]-sphericity and which means that there exists a
degree one, map f

of S
n
+N
to the Thom space V

of V
0
, i.e. f

sends the gener-
ator
[S
n
+N
] ∈ H
n
+N
(S
n
+N
) = Z (for some orientation of the sphere S
n
+N
) to the
fundamental class of the Thom space,
[V

∈ H
n
+N
(V

) = Z, which is distinguished
by the orientation in X. (One has to be pedantic with orientations to keep track
of possible/impossible algebraic cancellations.)

130
MIKHAIL GROMOV
However, this obstruction is “
Q-nonessential”, [2] : the set of the vector bundles
admitting such an f

constitutes a coset of a subgroup of finite index in Atiyah’s
(reduced) K-group by Serre’s finiteness theorem.
Recall that K
(X) is the Abelian group formally generated by the isomorphism
classes of vector bundles V over X, where
[V
1
] + [V
2
] =
def
0 whenever the Whitney
sum V
1
⊕ V
2
is isomorphic to a trivial bundle.
The Whitney sum of an
R
n
1
-bundle V
1
→ X with an R
n
2
-bundle V
2
→ X, is the
R
n
1
+n
2
-bundle over X. which equals the fiber-wise Cartesian product of the two
bundles.
For example the Whitney sum of the tangent bundle of a smooth submanifold
X
n
⊂ W
n
+N
and of its normal bundle in W equals the tangent bundle of W re-
stricted to X. Thus, it is trivial for W
= R
n
+N
, i.e. it isomorphic to
R
n
+N
×X → X,
since the tangent bundle of
R
n
+N
is, obviously, trivial.
Granted an f

∶ S
n
+N
→ V

of degree 1, we take the “generic pullback” X of
X
0
,
X
⊂ R
n
+N
⊂ R
n
+N

= S
n
+N
,
and denote by f
∶ X → X
0
the restriction of f

to X, where, recall, f induces the
normal bundle of X from V
0
. .
The map f
∶ X
1
→ X
0
, which is clearly onto, is far from being injective – it
may have uncontrollably complicated folds. In fact, it is not even a homotopy
equivalence – the homology homomorphism induced by f
f
∗i
∶ H
i
(X
1
) → H
i
(X
0
),
is, as we know, surjective and it may (and usually does) have non-trivial kernels
ker
i
⊂ H
i
(X
1
). However, these kernels can be “killed” by a “surgical implemen-
tation” of the obstruction theory (generalizing the case where X
0
= S
n
due to
Kervaire-Milnor) as follows.
Assume ker
i
= 0 for i = 0, 1, ..., k − 1, invoke Hurewicz’ theorem and realize the
cycles in ker
k
by k-spheres mapped to X
1
, where, observe, the f -images of these
spheres are contractible in X
0
by a relative version of the (elementary) Hurewicz
theorem.
Furthermore, if k
< n/2, then these spheres S
k
⊂ X
1
are generically embedded
(no self-intersections) and have trivial normal bundles in X
1
, since, essentially, they
come from V
→ X
1
via contractible maps. Thus, small neighbourhoods (ε-annuli)
A
= A
ε
of these spheres in X
1
split: A
= S
k
× B
n
−k
ε
⊂ X
1
.
It follows, that the corresponding spherical cycles can be killed by
(k+1)-surgery
(where X
1
now plays the role of Y in the definition of the surgery); moreover, it is
not hard to arrange a map of the resulting manifold to X
0
with the same properties
as f .
If n
= dim(X
0
) is odd, this works up to k = (n − 1)/2 and makes all ker
i
,
including i
> k, equal zero by the Poincar´e duality.
Since
a continuous map between simply connected spaces which induces
an isomorphism on homology is a homotopy equivalence by the
(elementary) Whitehead theorem,
the resulting manifold X is a homotopy equivalent to X
0
via our surgically modified
map f , call it f
srg
∶ X → X
0
.

MANIFOLDS
131
Besides, by the construction of f
srg
, this map induces the normal bundle of X
from V
→ X
0
. Thus we conclude,
the Atiyah
[V

]-sphericity is the only condition for realizing a
stable vector bundle V
0
→ X
0
by the normal bundle of a smooth
manifold X in the homotopy class of a given odd dimensional
simply connected manifold X
0
.
If n is even, we need to kill k-spheres for k
= n/2, where an extra obstruction arises.
For example, if k is even, the surgery does not change the signature; therefore,
the Pontryagin classes of the bundle V must satisfy the Rokhlin-Thom-Hirzebruch
formula to start with.
(There is an additional constraint for the tangent bundle T
(X) – the equality
between the Euler characteristic χ
(X) = ∑
i
=0,...,n
(−1)
i
rank
Q
(H
i
(X)) and the Euler
number e
(T (X)) that is the self-intersection index of X ⊂ T (X).)
On the other hand the equality L
(V )[X
0
] = sig(X
0
) (obviously) implies that
sig
(X) = sig(X
0
). It follows that
the intersection form on ker
k
⊂ H
k
(X) has zero signature,
since all h
∈ ker
k
have zero intersection indices with the pullbacks of k-cycles from
X
0
.
Then, assuming ker
i
= 0 for i < k and n ≠ 4, one can use Whitney’s lemma and
realize a basis in ker
k
⊂ H
k
(X
1
) by 2m embedded spheres S
k
2j
−1
, S
k
2j
⊂ X
1
, i
= 1, ...m,
which have zero self-intersection indices, one point crossings between S
k
2j
−1
and S
k
2j
and no other intersections between these spheres.
Since the spheres S
k
⊂ X with [S
k
] ∈ ker
k
have trivial stable normal bundles
U

(i.e. their Whitney sums with trivial 1-bundles, U

⊕R, are trivial), the normal
bundle U

= U

(S
k
) of such a sphere S
k
is trivial if and only if the Euler number
e
(U

) vanishes.
Indeed any oriented k-bundle V
→ B, such that V × R = B × R
k
+1
, is induced
from the tautological bundle V
0
over the oriented Grassmannian Gr
or
k
(R
k
+1
), where
Gr
or
k
(R
k
+1
) = S
k
and V
0
is the tangent bundle T
(S
k
). Thus, the Euler class of V is
induced from that of T
(S
k
) by the classifying map, G ∶ B → S
k
. If B
= S
k
then the
Euler number of e
(V ) equals 2 deg(G) and if e(V ) = 0 the map G is contractible
which makes V
= S
k
× R
k
.
Now, observe, e
(U

(S
k
)) is conveniently equal to the self-intersection index of
S
k
in X. (e
(U

(S
k
)) equals, by definition, the self-intersection of S
k
⊂ U

(S
k
)
which is the same as the self-intersection of this sphere in X.)
Then it easy to see that the
(k + 1)-surgeries applied to the spheres S
k
2j
, j
=
1, ..., m, kill all of ker
k
and make X
→ X
0
a homotopy equivalence.
There are several points to check (and to correct) in the above argument, but
everything fits amazingly well in the lap of the linear algebra (The case of odd k is
more subtle due to the Kervaire-Arf invariant.)
Notice, that our starting X
0
does not need to be a manifold, but rather a
Poincar´
e (Browder) n-space, i.e. a finite cell complex satisfying the Poincar´
e du-
ality: H
i
(X
0
,
F) = H
n
−i
(X
0
,
F) for all coefficient fields (and rings) F, where these
“equalities” must be coherent in an obvious sense for different
F.
Also, besides the existence of smooth n-manifolds X, the above surgery ar-
gument applied to a bordism Y between homotopy equivalent manifolds X
1
and
X
2
. Under suitable conditions on the normal bundle of Y , such a bordism can be

132
MIKHAIL GROMOV
surgically modified to an h-cobordism. Together with the h-cobordism theorem,
this leads to an algebraic classification of smooth structures on simply connected
manifolds of dimension n
≥ 5. (see [54]).
Then the Serre finiteness theorem implies that
there are at most finitely many smooth closed simply connected
n-manifolds X in a given a homotopy class and with given Pon-
tryagin classes p
k
∈ H
4k
(X).
Summing up, the question “What are manifolds?” has the following
1962 Answer.
Smooth closed simply connected n-manifolds for n
≥ 5, up to
a “finite correction term”, are “just” simply connected Poincar´
e n-spaces X with
distinguished cohomology classes p
i
∈ H
4i
(X), such that L
k
(p
i
)[X] = sig(X) if
n
= 4k.
This is a fantastic answer to the “manifold problem” undreamed of 10 years
earlier. Yet,
● Poincar´e spaces are not classifiable. Even the candidates for the cohomol-
ogy rings are not classifiable over
Q.
Are there special “interesting” classes of manifolds and/or coarser than dif f clas-
sifications? (Something mediating between bordisms and h-cobordisms maybe?)
● The π
1
= 1 is very restrictive. The surgery theory extends to manifolds
with an arbitrary fundamental group Γ and, modulo the Novikov conjec-
ture – a non-simply connected counterpart to the relation L
k
(p
i
)[X] =
sig
(X) (see next section) – delivers a comparably exhaustive answer in
terms of the “Poincar´
e complexes over (the group ring of) Γ” (see [78]).
But this does not tells you much about “topologically interesting” Γ, e.g. funda-
mental groups of n-manifold X with the universal covering
R
n
(see [13] [14] about
it).
10. Elliptic Wings and Parabolic Flows
The geometric texture in the topology we have seen so far was all on the side of
the “entropy”; topologists were finding gentle routes in the rugged landscape of all
possibilities, you do not have to sweat climbing up steep energy gradients on these
routs. And there was no essential new analysis in this texture for about 50 years
since Poincar´
e.
Analysis came back with a bang in 1963 when Atiyah and Singer discovered
the index theorem.
The underlying idea is simple: the “difference” between dimensions of two
spaces, say Φ and Ψ, can be defined and be finite even if the spaces themselves are
infinite dimensional, provided the spaces come with a linear (sometimes non-linear)
Fredholm operator D
∶ Φ → Ψ . This means, there exists an operator E ∶ Ψ → Φ
such that
(1 − D ○ E) ∶ Ψ → Ψ and (1 − E ○ D) ∶ Φ → Φ are compact operators. (In
the non-linear case, the definition(s) is local and more elaborate.)
If D is Fredholm, then the spaces ker
(D) and coker(D) = Ψ/D(Φ) are finite
dimensional and the index ind
(D) = dim(ker(D)) − dim(coker(D)) is (by a simple
argument) is a homotopy invariant of D in the space of Fredholm operators.
If, and this is a “big IF”, you can associate such a D to a geometric or topo-
logical object X, this index will serve as an invariant of X.

MANIFOLDS
133
It was known since long that elliptic differential operators, e.g. the ordinary
Laplace operator, are Fredholm under suitable (boundary) conditions but most of
these “natural” operators are self-adjoint and always have zero indices: they are of
no use in topology.
“Interesting” elliptic differential operators D are scarce: the ellipticity condition
is a tricky inequality (or, rather, non-equality) between the coefficients of D. In
fact, all such (linear) operators currently in use descend from a single one: the
Atiyah-Singer-Dirac operator on spinors.
Atiyah and Singer have computed the indices of their geometric operators in
terms of traditional topological invariants, and thus discovered new properties of
the latter.
For example, they expressed the signature of a closed smooth Riemannian man-
ifold X as an index of such an operator D
sig
acting on differential forms on X. Since
the parametrix operator E for an elliptic operator D can be obtained by piecing
together local parametrices, the very existence of D
sig
implies the multiplicativity
of the signature.
The elliptic theory of Atiyah and Singer and their many followers, unlike the
classical theory of PDE, is functorial in nature as it deals with many interconnected
operators at the same time in coherent manner.
Thus smooth structures on potential manifolds (Poincar´
e complexes) define a
functor from the homotopy category to the category of “Fredholm diagrams” (e.g.
operators—one arrow diagrams); one is tempted to forget manifolds and study such
functors per se. For example, a closed smooth manifold represents a homology class
in Atiyah’s K-theory – the index of D
sig
, twisted with vector bundles over X with
connections in them.
Interestingly enough, one of the first topological applications of the index the-
ory, which equally applies to all dimensions be they big or small, was the solution
(Massey, 1969) of the Whitney 4D-conjecture of 1941 which, in a simplified form,
says the following.
The number N
(Y ) of possible normal bundles of a closed con-
nected non-orientable surface Y embedded into the Euclidean
space
R
4
equals
∣χ(Y ) − 1∣ + 1, where χ denotes the Euler char-
acteristic.Equivalently, there are
∣χ(Y ) − 1∣ = 1 possible homeo-
morphisms types of small normal neighbourhoods of Y in
R
4
.
If Y is an orientable surface then N
(Y ) = 1, since a small neighbourhood of such a
Y
⊂ R
4
is homeomorphic to Y
× R
2
by an elementary argument.
If Y is non-orientable, Whitney has shown that N
(Y ) ≥ ∣χ(Y ) − 1∣ + 1 by
constructing N
= ∣χ(Y ) − 1∣ + 1 embeddings of each Y to R
4
with different normal
bundles and then conjectured that one could not do better.
Outline of Massey’s Proof. Take the (unique in this case) ramified double
covering X of S
4
⊃ R
4
⊃ Y branched at Y with the natural involution I ∶ X →
X. Express the signature of I, that is the quadratic form on H
2
(X) defined by
the intersection of cycles C and I
(C) in X, in terms of the Euler number e

of
the normal bundle of Y
⊂ R
4
as sig
= e

/2 (with suitable orientation and sign
conventions) by applying the Atiyah-Singer equivariant signature theorem. Show
that rank
(H
2
(X)) = 2 − χ(Y ) and thus establish the bound ∣e

/2∣ ≤ 2 − χ(Y ) in
agreement with Whitney’s conjecture.

134
MIKHAIL GROMOV
(The experience of the high dimensional topology would suggest that N
(Y ) =
∞. Now-a-days, multiple constrains on topology of embeddings of surfaces into
4-manifolds are derived with Donaldson’s theory.)
Non-simply Connected Analytic Geometry. The Browder-Novikov the-
ory implies that, besides the Euler-Poincar´
e formula, there is a single “
Q-essential
(i.e. non-torsion) homotopy constraint” on tangent bundles of closed simply con-
nected 4k-manifolds– the Rokhlin-Thom-Hirzebruch signature relation.
But in 1966, Sergey Novikov, in the course of his proof of the topological invari-
ance of the of the rational Pontryagin classes, i.e. of the homology homomorphism
H

(X
n
;
Q) → H

(Gr
N
(R
n
+N
); Q) induced by the normal Gauss map, found the
following new relation for non-simply connected manifolds X.
Let f
∶ X
n
→ Y
n
−4k
be a smooth map. Then the signature of the 4k-dimensional
pullback manifold Z
= f
−1
(y) of a generic point, sig[f] = sig(Z), does not depend
on the point and/or on f within a given homotopy class
[f] by the generic pull-back
theorem and the cobordism invariance of the signature, but it may change under a
homotopy equivalence h
∶ X
1
→ X
2
.
By an elaborate (and, at first sight, circular) surgery
+ algebraic K-theory
argument, Novikov proves that
if Y is a k-torus, then sig
[f ○ h] = sig[f],
where the simplest case of the projection X
× T
n
−4k
→ T
n
−4k
is (almost all) what
is needed for the topological invariance of the Pontryagin classes. (See [27] for


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-scientific-case.html

the-scope-of-sewage.html

the-search-for-a-new.html

the-seckington-family--.html

the-second-stain-vtoroe.html