1 ... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 10

bet10/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
4k
−1
→ X of
positive degree and the composed map S
4k
−1
→ X → S
2k
generates an infinite cyclic
group of finite index in π
4k
−1
(S
2k
).
The proof by Serre—a geometer’s nightmare—consists in tracking a multitude
of linear-algebraic relations between the homology and homotopy groups of infinite
dimensional spaces of maps between spheres and it tells you next to nothing about
the geometry of these maps. (See [57] for a “semi-geometric” proof of the finiteness
of the stable homotopy groups of spheres and Section 5 of this article for a related
discussion. Also, the construction in [23] may be relevant.)
Recall that the set of the homotopy classes of maps of a sphere S
M
to a con-
nected space X makes a group denoted π
M
(X), (π is for Poincar´e who defined
the fundamental group π
1
) where the definition of the group structure depends on
distinguished points x
0
∈ X and s
0
∈ S
M
. The groups π
M
defined with different x
0
are mutually isomorphic, and if X is simply connected, i.e. π
1
(X) = 1, then they
are canonically isomorphic.
This point in S
M
may be chosen with the representation of S
M
as the one
point compactification of the Euclidean space
R
M
, denoted
R
M

, where this infinity
point
● is taken for s
0
. It is convenient, instead of maps S
m
= R
m

→ (X, x
0
), to
deal with maps f
∶ R
M
→ X “with compact supports”, where the support of an f

84
MIKHAIL GROMOV
is the closure of the (open) subset supp
(f) = supp
x
0
(f) ⊂ R
m
which consists of the
points s
∈ R
m
such that f
(s) ≠ x
0
.
A pair of maps f
1
, f
2
∶ R
M
→ X with disjoint compact supports obviously
defines “the joint map” f
∶ R
M
→ X, where the homotopy class of f (obviously)
depends only on those of f
1
, f
2
, provided supp
(f
1
) lies in the left half space {s
1
<
0
} ⊂ R
m
and supp
(f
2
) ⊂ {s
1
> 0} ⊂ R
M
, where s
1
is a non-zero linear function
(coordinate) on
R
M
.
The composition of the homotopy classes of two maps, denoted
[f
1
] ⋅ [f
2
], is
defined as the homotopy class of the joint of f
1
moved far to the left with f
2
moved
far to the right.
Geometry is sacrificed here for the sake of algebraic convenience: first, we break
the symmetry of the sphere S
M
by choosing a base point, and then we destroy the
symmetry of
R
M
by the choice of s
1
. If M
= 1, then there are essentially two
choices: s
1
and
−s
1
, which correspond to interchanging f
1
with f
2
—nothing wrong
with this as the composition is, in general, non-commutative.
In general M
≥ 2, these s
1
≠ 0 are, homotopically speaking, parametrized by
the unit sphere S
M
−1
⊂ R
M
. Since S
M
−1
is connected for M
≥ 2, the composition is
commutative and, accordingly, the composition in π
i
for i
≥ 2 is denoted [f
1
]+[f
2
].
Good for algebra, but the O
(M +1)-ambiguity seems too great a price for this. (An
algebraist would respond to this by pointing out that the ambiguity is resolved in
the language of operads or something else of this kind.)
But this is, probably, unavoidable. For example, the best you can do for maps
S
M
→ S
M
in a given non-trivial homotopy class is to make them symmetric (i.e.
equivariant) under the action of the maximal torus
T
k
in the orthogonal group
O
(M + 1), where k = M/2 for even M and k = (M + 1)/2 for M odd.
And if n
≥ 1, then, with a few exceptions, there are no apparent symmetric
representatives in the homotopy classes of maps S
n
+N
→ S
N
; yet Serre’s theorem
does carry a geometric message.
If n
≠ 0, N − 1, then every continuous map f
0
∶ S
n
+N
→ S
N
is
homotopic to a map f
1
∶ S
n
+N
→ S
N
of dilation bounded by a
constant,
dil
(f
1
) =
def
sup
s
1
≠s
2
∈S
n
+N
dist
(f(s
1
), f(s
2
))
dist
(s
1
, s
2
)
≤ const(n, N).
Dilation Questions. (1) What is the asymptotic behaviour of const
(n, N)
for n, N
→ ∞?
For all we know the Serre dilation constant const
S
(n, N) may be bounded for
n
→ ∞ and, say, for 1 ≤ N ≤ n − 2, but a bound one can see offhand is that by an
exponential tower
(1 + c)
(1+c)
(1+c)...
, of height N , since each geometric implemen-
tation of the homotopy lifting property in a Serre fibrations may bring along an
exponential dilation. Probably, the (questionably) geometric approach to the Serre
theorem via “singular bordisms” (see [74], [23],[1] and Section 5) delivers a better
estimate.
(2) Let f
∶ S
n
+N
→ S
N
be a contractible map of dilation d, e.g. f equals the
m-multiple of another map where m is divisible by the order of π
n
+N
(S
N
).
What is, roughly, the minimum D
min
= D(d, n, N) of dilations of maps F of
the unit ball B
n
+N+1
→ S
N
which are equal to f on ∂
(B
n
+N+1
) = S
n
+N
?

MANIFOLDS
85
Of course, this dilation is the most naive invariant measuring the “geometric
size of a map”. Possibly, an interesting answer to these questions needs a more
imaginative definition of “geometric size/shape” of a map, e.g. in the spirit of the
minimal degrees of polynomials representing such a map.
Serre’s theorem and its descendants underlie most of the topology of the high
dimensional manifolds. Below are frequently used corollaries which relate homotopy
problems concerning general spaces X to the homology groups H
i
(X) (see Section
4 for definitions) which are much easier to handle.
Theorem
([S
n
+N
→ X]-Theorems). Let X be a compact connected triangulated
or cellular space, (defined below) or, more generally, a connected space with finitely
generated homology groups H
i
(X), i = 1, 2, . . . . If the space X is simply connected,
i.e. π
1
(X) = 1, then its homotopy groups have the following properties.
(1) Finite Generation. The groups π
m
(X) are (Abelian!) finitely generated
for all m
= 2, 3, . . ..
(2) Sphericity. If π
i
(X) = 0 for i = 1, 2, N − 1, then the (obvious) Hurewicz
homomorphism
π
N
(X) → H
N
(X),
which assigns, to a map S
N
→ X, the N-cycle represented by this N-sphere
in X, is an isomorphism. (This is elementary, Hurewicz 1935.)
(3)
Q-Sphericity. If the groups π
i
(X) are finite for i = 2, N − 1 (recall that
we assume π
1
(X) = 1), then the Hurewicz homomorphism tensored with
rational numbers,
π
N
+n
(X) ⊗ Q → H
N
+n
(X) ⊗ Q,
is an isomorphism for n
= 1, . . . , N − 2.
Because of the finite generation property, The
Q-sphericity is equivalent to the
following.
Theorem
(Serre m-Sphericity Theorem). (3

) Let the groups π
i
(X) be finite
(e.g. trivial) for i
= 1, 2, . . . , N − 1 and n ≤ N − 2. Then an m-multiple of every
(N +n)-cycle in X for some m ≠ 0 is homologous to an (N +n)-sphere continuously
mapped to X; every two homologous spheres S
N
+n
→ X become homotopic when
composed with a non-contractible i.e. of degree m
≠ 0, self-mapping S
n
+N
→ S
n
+N
.
In more algebraic terms, the elements s
1
, s
2
∈ π
n
+N
(X) represented by these spheres
satisfy ms
1
− ms
2
= 0.
The following is the dual of the m-Sphericity.
Theorem
(Serre
[→ S
N
]
Q
- Theorem). Let X be a compact triangulated space
of dimension n
+ N, where either N is odd or n < N − 1. Then a non-zero multiple
of every homomorphism H
N
(X) → H
N
(S
N
) can be realized by a continuous map
X
→ S
N
.
If two continuous maps are f, g
∶ X → S
N
are homologous, i.e. if the homology
homomorphisms f

, g

∶ H
N
(X) → H
N
(S
N
) = Z are equal, then there exists a
continuous self-mapping σ
∶ S
N
→ S
N
of non-zero degree such that the composed
maps σ
○ f and σ ○ f ∶ X → S
N
are homotopic.
These
Q-theorems follow from the Serre finiteness theorem for maps between
spheres by an elementary argument of induction by skeletons and rudimentary ob-
struction theory which run, roughly, as follows.

86
MIKHAIL GROMOV
Cellular and Triangulated Spaces. Recall that a cellular space is a topo-
logical space X with an ascending (finite or infinite) sequence of closed subspaces
X
0
⊂ X
1
⊂ ⋯ ⊂ X
i
⊂ ⋯ called he i-skeleta of X, such that ⋃
i
(X
i
) = X and such
that X
0
is a discrete finite or countable subset. Every X
i
, i
> 0, is obtained by
attaching a countably (or finitely) many i-balls B
i
to X
i
−1
by continuous maps of
the boundaries S
i
−1
= ∂(B
i
) of these balls to X
i
−1
.
For example, if X is a triangulated space then it comes with homeomorphic
embeddings of the i-simplices Δ
i
→ X
i
extending their boundary maps, ∂

i
) →
X
i
−1
⊂ X
i
where one additionally requires (here the word “simplex”, which is,
topologically speaking, is indistinguishable from B
i
, becomes relevant) that the
intersection of two such simplices Δ
i
and Δ
j
imbedded into X is a simplex Δ
k
which is a face simplex in Δ
i
⊃ Δ
k
and in Δ
j
⊃ Δ
k
.
If X is a non-simplicial cellular space, we also have continuous maps B
i
→ X
i
but they are, in general, embeddings only on the interiors B
i
∖ ∂(B
i
), since the
attaching maps ∂
(B
i
) → X
i
−1
are not necessarily injective. Nevertheless, the images
of B
i
in X are called closed cells, and denoted B
i
⊂ X
i
, where the union of all these
i-cells equals X
i
.
Observe that the homotopy equivalence class of X
i
is determined by that of
X
i
−1
and by the homotopy classes of maps from the spheres S
i
−1
= ∂(B
i
) to X
i
−1
.
We are free to take any maps S
i
−1
→ X
i
−1
we wish in assembling a cellular X
which make cells more efficient building blocks of general spaces than simplices.
For example, the sphere S
n
can be made of a 0-cell and a single n-cell.
If X
i
−1
= S
l
for some l
≤ i − 1 (one has l < i − 1 if there is no cells of dimensions
between l and i
−1) then the homotopy equivalence classes of X
i
with a single i-cell
one-to-one correspond to the homotopy group π
i
−1
(S
l
).
On the other hand, every cellular space can be approximated by a homotopy
equivalent simplicial one, which is done by induction on skeletons X
i
with an ap-
proximation of continuous attaching maps by simplicial maps from
(i − 1)-spheres
to X
i
−1
.
Recall that a homotopy equivalence between X
1
and X
2
is given by a pair of
maps f
12
∶ X
1
→ X
2
and f
21
∶ X
2
→ X
1
, such that both composed maps f
12
○ f
21

X
1
→ X
1
and f
21
○ f
12
∶ X
2
→ X
2
are homotopic to the identity.
Obstructions and Cohomology. Let Y be a connected space such that
π
i
(Y ) = 0 for i = 1, . . . , n − 1 ≥ 1, let f ∶ X → Y be a continuous map and let
us construct, by induction on i
= 0, 1, . . . , n − 1, a map f
new
∶ X → Y which is
homotopic to f and which sends X
n
−1
to a point y
0
∈ Y as follows.
Assume f
(X
i
−1
) = y
0
. Then the resulting map B
i f
→ Y , for each i-cell B
i
from
X
i
, makes an i-sphere in Y , because the boundary ∂B
i
⊂ X
i
−1
goes to a single
point—our to y
0
in Y .
Since π
i
(Y ) = 0, this B
i
in Y can be contracted to y
0
without disturbing its
boundary. We do it all i-cells from X
i
and, thus, contract X
i
to y
0
. One cannot,
in general, extend a continuous map from a closed subset X

⊂ X to X, but one
always can extend a continuous homotopy f

t
∶ X

→ Y , t ∈ [0, 1], of a given map
f
0
∶ X → Y , f
0
∣X

= f

0
, to a homotopy f
t
∶ X → Y for all closed subsets X

⊂ X,
similarly to how one extends
R-valued functions from X

⊂ X to X.
The contraction of X to a point in Y can be obstructed on the n-th step, where
π
n
(Y ) ≠ 0, and where each oriented n-cell B
n
⊂ X mapped to Y with ∂(B
n
) → y
0

MANIFOLDS
87
represents an element c
∈ π
n
(Y ) which may be non-zero. (When we switch an
orientation in B
n
, then c
↦ −c.)
We assume at this point, that our space X is a triangulated one, switch from
B
n
to Δ
n
and observe that the function c

n
) is (obviously) an n-cocycle in X
with values in the group π
n
(Y ), which means (this is what is longer to explain for
general cell spaces) that the sum of c

n
) over the n+2 face-simplices Δ
n
⊂ ∂Δ
n
+1
equals zero, for all Δ
n
+1
in the triangulation (if we canonically/correctly choose
orientations in all Δ
n
).
The cohomology class
[c] ∈ H
n
(X; π
n
(X)) of this cocycle does not depend (by
an easy argument) on how the
(n − 1)-skeleton was contracted. Moreover, every
cocycle c

in the class of
[c] can be obtained by a homotopy of the map on X
n
which
is kept constant on X
n
−2
. (Two A-valued n-cocycles c and c

, for an abelian group
A, are in the same cohomology class if there exists an A-valued function d

n
−1
) on
the oriented simplices Δ
n
−1
⊂ X
n
−1
, such that

Δ
n
−1
⊂Δ
n
d

n
−1
) = c(Δ
n
) − c


n
)
for all Δ
n
. The set of the cohomology classes of n-cocycles with a natural additive
structure is called the cohomology group H
n
(X; A). It can be shown that H
n
(X; A)
depends only on X but not an a particular choice of a triangulation of X. See
Section 4 for a lighter geometric definitions of homology and cohomology.)
In particular, if dim
(X) = n we, thus, equate the set [X → Y ] of the homotopy
classes of maps X
→ Y with the cohomology group H
n
(X; π
n
(X)). Furthermore,
this argument applied to X
= S
n
shows that π
n
(X) = H
n
(X) and, in general, that
the following is true.
The set of the homotopy classes of maps X
→ Y equals the set
of homomorphisms H
n
(X) → H
n
(Y ), provided π
i
(Y ) = 0 for
0
< i < dim(X).
Finally, when we use this construction for proving the above
Q-theorems where one
of the spaces is a sphere, we keep composing our maps with self-mappings of this
sphere of suitable degree m
≠ 0 that kills the obstructions by the Serre finiteness
theorem.
For example, if X is a finite cellular space without 1-cells, one can define the
homotopy multiple l

X, for every integer l, by replacing the attaching maps of all
(i + 1)-cells, S
i
→ X
i
, by l
k
i
-multiples of these maps in π
i
(X
i
) for k
2
<< k
3
<< . . .,
where this l

X comes along with a map l

X
→ X which induces isomorphisms on
all homotopy groups tensored with
Q.
The obstruction theory, developed by Eilenberg in 1940 following Pontryagin’s
1938 paper, well displays the logic of algebraic topology: the geometric symmetry of
X (if there was any) is broken by an arbitrary triangulation or a cell decomposition
and then another kind of symmetry, an Abelian algebraic one, emerges on the
(co)homology level.
Serre’s idea is that the homotopy types of finite simply connected cell com-
plexes as well as of finite diagrams of continuous maps between these are finitary
arithmetic objects which can be encoded by finitely many polynomial equations
and non-equalities with integer coefficients, and where the structural organization
of the homotopy theory depends on non-finitary objects which are inductive limits
of finitary ones, such as the homotopy types of spaces of continuous maps between
finite cell spaces.

88
MIKHAIL GROMOV
3. Generic Pullbacks
A common zero set of N smooth (i.e. infinitely differentiable) functions f
i

R
n
+N
→ R, i = 1, . . . , N, may be very nasty even for N = 1—every closed subset in
R
n
+1
can be represented as a zero of a smooth function. However, if the functions f
i
are taken in general position, then the common zero set is a smooth n-submanifold
in
R
n
+N
.
Here and below, “f in general position” or “generic f ”, where f is an element
of a topological space F , e.g. of the space of C

-maps with the C

-topology,
means that what we say about f applies to all f in an open and dense subset in F .
Sometimes, one allows not only open dense sets in the definition of genericity but
also their countable intersections.
Generic smooth (unlike continuous) objects are as nice as we expect them to be;
the proofs of this “niceness” are local-analytic and elementary (at least in the cases
we need); everything trivially follows from Sard’s theorem
+ the implicit function
theorem.
The representation of manifolds with functions generalizes as follows.
Generic Pullback Construction. (Pontryagin 1938, Thom 1954).
Start
with a smooth N -manifold V , e.g. V
= R
N
or V
= S
N
, and let X
0
⊂ V be a smooth
submanifold, e.g. 0
∈ R
N
or a point x
0
∈ S
N
. Let W be a smooth manifold of
dimension M , e.g. M
= n + N.
Theorem.
If f
∶ W → V is a generic smooth map, then the pullback X =
f
−1
(X
0
) ⊂ W is a smooth submanifold in W with codim
W
(X) = codim
V
(X
0
), i.e.
M
−dim(X) = N −dim(X
0
). Moreover, if the manifolds W , V and X
0
are oriented,
then X comes with a natural orientation. Furthermore, if W has a boundary then
X is a smooth submanifold in W with a boundary ∂
(X) ⊂ ∂(W ).
Example
(a). Let f
∶ W ⊂ V ⊃ X
0
be a smooth, possibly non-generic, em-
bedding of W into V . Then a small generic perturbation f

∶ W → V of f re-
mains an embedding, such that image W

= f

(W ) ⊂ V in V becomes transver-
sal (i.e. nowhere tangent) to X
0
. One sees with the full geometric clarity (with
a picture of two planes in the 3-space which intersect at a line) that the inter-
section X
= W

∩ X
0
(= (f

)
−1
(X
0
)) is a submanifold in V with codim
V
(X) =
codim
V
(W ) + codim
V
(X
0
).
Example
(b). Let f
∶ S
3
→ S
2
be a smooth map and S
1
, S
2
∈ S
3
be the
pullbacks of two generic points s
1
, s
2
∈ S
2
. These S
i
are smooth closed curves; they
are naturally oriented, granted orientations in S
2
and in S
3
.
Let D
i
⊂ B
4
= ∂(S
3
), i = 1, 2, be generic smooth oriented surfaces in the ball
B
4
⊃ S
3
= ∂(B
4
) with their oriented boundaries equal S
i
and let h
(f) denote the
intersection index (defined in the next section) between D
i
.
Suppose, the map f is homotopic to zero, extend it to a smooth generic map
ϕ
∶ B
4
→ S
2
and take the ϕ-pullbacks D
ϕ
i
= ϕ
−1
(s
i
) ⊂ B
4
of s
i
.
Let S
4
be the 4-sphere obtained from the two copies of B
4
by identifying the
boundaries of the balls and let C
i
= D
i
∪ D
ϕ
i
⊂ S
4
.
Since ∂
(D
i
) = ∂(D
ϕ
i
) = S
i
, these C
i
are closed surfaces; hence, the intersection
index between them equals zero (because they are homologous to zero in S
4
, see the
next section), and since D
ϕ
i
do not intersect, the intersection index h
(f) between
D
i
is also zero.


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-series-of-the-112.html

the-series-of-the-117.html

the-series-of-the-14.html

the-series-of-the-19.html

the-series-of-the-23.html