©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.

The pri mate so ciet y of g reat br itai - səhifə 8


 



 



Infant Handl



ing in Black-and-Whi



te Colob



us (



Col



obus guerez



a

) in 



Kanyaw



ara, Ki



bale Na



tion



al P



ark,



 U



gan



da 

Katr


ina D.

 Sher


enco

, Stu


art

 Semp


le

 

and Car



oli

ne R


oss 

Cent


re for 

Research i

n Ev

olut


ionar

y Ant


hro

pol


ogy

, Roe


ham

pton


 

Univ


ersity, London

 

Email: sh



erenco

k1@hotm


ail.co



 

A num

ber of


 hypot

heses atte

mpt

 to expl


ain t

he p


hen

om

enon of i



nfa

nt 


hand

ling, 


parti

cul


arly within

 pr


imate sp

ecies. Th

is study 

evalu


ates two

 of


 

the m


ost

 com


mon hy

pothes


es, t

he ‘l


earni

ng t


o m

oth


er hy

pothe


sis’ a

nd t


he 

‘matern


al relie

f hypo


thesis’, in

 black-an

d-wh

ite colob



us mo

nkeys (


Colobus 

guereza

) at Kan


yawara, 

Kibale National Park, 

Ugand

a. A ten-week stu



dy 

from


 March-

May


 2008 c

ollect


ed 310 f

ocal


 anim

al obser


vatio

ns of


 45 

minut


es from

 five 


habitu

ated


 grou

ps. C


ontin

uou


s reco

rding 


of be

haviou


ral 

activities 

measur

ed all o


ccurren

ces and du

rations

 of infant h



and

ling bouts, 

along

 with


 wh

ich an


imal i

nitiated


 the 

han


dling

. Th


ere was a sign

ificant 


differe

nce in infant ha

ndling diffe

rence sco

res 

within


 the juv

enile fem

ale 

age-sex class 



and the adult 

fem


ale age-

sex cl


ass. Juve

nile


 femal

es had 


the

 

greatest t



otal nu

mber of i

nfant h

and


ling bo

uts and h

ad m

ore po


sitive infan

handl



ing 

diffe


rence sc

ores (i


.e. ha

ndled


 more t

han


 woul

d be e


xpected

 by


 

chance give

n the group composition). 

When


 looking at infa

nt handling rates 

of i

ndi


vidu

al infan


ts, t

here 


were sign

ificant n

ega

tive correlatio



ns be

tween 


the rate th

e infant was h

andled

 and infant



 age and between 

non-mother 

infa

nt ha


ndl

ing 


bout

s by


 non

-mot


hers a

nd i


nfa

nt age


. M

oth


ers di

d not


 

appe


ar to g

ain an


y energ

etic b


ene

fits from

 relinqu

ishin


g th

eir infan

ts 

to 


othe

rs as t


her

e we


re no

 rel


ations

hips 


betw

een t


he 

rates 


of ha

ndl


ing

 of t


hei

infan



ts an

d either m

oth

er’s rates of feedi



ng or

 rat


e o

f rest


ing.

 T

hus, 



the 

finding


s of th

is study


 support th

e ‘learning

 to m

oth


er hypo

thesis’ as juv

enile 

26


REPORT: IPS2008 EDINBURGH 

 

 



The International Primatological Society 



XXII Congress 



3-8 August 2008 



Edinburgh 

 

We arrive on Sunday afternoon in Edinburgh. The streets are packed with 



revellers, street performers, and we can taste the festival atmosphere. The 

coming week we will see very little of the Edinburgh Festival, because we 

are headed for the Edinburgh International Conference Centre where the 

XXII Congress of the International Primatological Society is held. The 

programme is so packed with presentations, lectures, films, posters 

receptions and social events, that we will hardly set foot outside the 

Conference Centre. 

 

The Congress was opened by Paul Honess, the 2008 Chair of the IPS 



Executive Committee, who welcomed the 1000 plus delegates, the 

committee organisers and the representatives of the Primate Society of 

Great Britain to the Congress. This was followed by a welcome from the 

president of PSGB, Ann MacLarnon. She paid homage to Dr Charles 

Lockwood, who died suddenly on 14 July 2008, and is greatly missed by 

friends and colleagues. Stephen Nash was awarded the PSGB Medal for 

Special Contributions to Primatology for his wonderful drawings of 

primates. The welcome ceremony was concluded by a photographic 

presentation by Cristina Mittermeier and Kathy Moran, and followed by a 

welcome drinks reception. 

 

The President of IPS, Richard Wrangham, addressed the delegates on 



Monday morning on The growing importance of primate research, drawing 

particular attention to the links between primatological research and the 

development of conservation, education and captive care strategies. 

Professor Wrangham pointed out that despite the vast increases seen in 

primate-focused field-work over the last 60 years, the threats to primates 

continue to mount with nearly 50% of all primate species classed as 

threatened. He particularly espoused the benefits of long-term field 

research, drawing on the examples of Kibale and Gombe, including the 

encouragement of ecotourism and national park creation, increased 

community investment and the introduction of education programmes. His 

over-arching message was to encourage a synergy between research and 

conservation and he ended with a call to “Let a thousand field stations 

bloom!” 

 

29



The presidential address was followed by Andrew Whiten, who gave a 

plenary lecture on the presence of tradition and culture in non-human 

primate societies and what this tells us about the origin of culture in our 

own species. Much of the lecture consisted of the description of ingenious 

experiments aimed at uncovering the mechanisms behind social learning, 

the passing on of traditions and the possible existence of culture in primates. 

Many of the studies Professor Whiten described were designed to bridge the 

gap between wild observations and captive experiments such as is the 

Living Links exhibit at Edinburgh Zoo, which the IPS delegates would have 

a chance to visit later in the week. The exhibit consists of two mixed groups 

of capuchin and squirrel monkeys set up to examine culture, traditions and 

social learning via ‘diffusion experiments’. Professor Whiten finished his 

lecture by questioning the currently popular idea that the evolution of true 

imitation kick-started the rapid development of human culture, drawing on 

the results of diffusion experiments to propose that tradition and imitative 

copying were in place before this development and suggesting that another 

factor such as tool manufacture may have played a more important role.     

 

After the coffee break, and throughout the rest of the week, there were an 



overwhelming number of concurrent sessions, on a wide variety of topics. 

We will only discuss a few here. Gottfried Hohmann in his talk on 



Frugivory and food sharing in bonobos and chimpanzees presented the first 

evidence of hunting of monkeys by wild bonobos, and the implications 

these findings have on evolutionary models, and Peter Henzi in his talk on 

Infanticide and reproductive restraint in chacma baboons discussed how an 

alpha male, the most likely father of a troop’s infants, can decrease 

infanticide risk by conceding conceptions to other group males. The poster 

session to conclude the first day was a great opportunity to find out about 

current research projects, and meet the researchers working on them. 

 

The session was opened on Tuesday morning by a plenary lecture by Robert 



Martin on Primate evolution: the general framework revisited, a discussion 

of the importance of using complementary methods to construct a reliable 

account of primate evolution, with a special emphasis on reproductive and 

brain biology. Lynne Miller convened an interesting symposium on Field 



experiments: the challenges and benefits of using experimental methods in 

field research, in which several researchers such as Tabitha Price and Dawn 

Kitchen showed increasing importance of field-work experiments in 

primatology. Another fascinating symposium on Emerging methods in field 

primatology gave a chance for researchers such as Melissa Emery 

Thompson and Erin Vogel to discuss brand new techniques such as the use 

of urinary C-peptide of insulin to investigate energy balance in wild 

primates. On Tuesday evening we had a truly Scottish experience, Ceilidh 

dancing, which was easily the highlight of the week. Whilst at first the 

dancing was tentative, and the dancers closely followed the instructions of 

the caller, as the evening wore on the dancers got more confident, and the 

30


dancing more spirited. We would like to give a special mention here to 

Robin Dunbar, who was not seen to leave the dance floor, and to mention 

that his energetic dancing did not belie his Scottish roots. The only 

complaint was the evening ending, as we could all have easily danced until 

the wee hours of the morning!  

 

Wednesday was opened by a plenary lecture by Karen Strier, who talked on 



Primate populations: where behavioural variation, life histories, and 

conservation coincide. Jon Oates gave a very interesting talk on Historical 

and biogeographical perspective on the apes of western Cameroon and 

Nigeria in which he presented evidence that the vellerosus chimpanzees are 

closer related to troglodytes and schweinfurthii, than to verus chimpanzees. 

In the evening there was another opportunity to meet researchers and talk 

about their current projects in the second poster session. Russell 

Mittermeier reminded us of the critical condition many primates are 

currently in, in his public lecture on The world’s 25 most endangered 



primates – 2008-2010.  

 

Thursday was opened with a plenary lecture from Toshisada Nishida, 



winner of the 2008 IPS Lifetime Achievement Award, giving an overview 

of forty years of chimpanzee research at Mahale, the project he has headed 

since 1965. An interesting collection of papers on Eco- and phylo-

geography were presented on Thursday afternoon including a discussion of 

the decrease in primate diversity with increasing latitude by Brian Schreier. 

He proposed that the general increase in body size and the decrease in 

variance away from the tropics is due to the fact that the tropics were the 

cradle of primate evolution and that only a subset of species, those that have 

neither the high absolute energetic demands of very large species or the 

high intake rate requirements of very small species, can survive the 

constraints of a temperate climate. The day concluded with a barbecue at 

Edinburgh Zoo and a chance for delegates to explore the many primate 

exhibits including the new Living Links centre. Tickets for this event were 

so coveted that counterfeit tickets were found to be in circulation! 

Unfortunately this meant that queues for the barbecue were long, and little 

time was left to walk around the zoo. 

 

The final day of the Congress was opened by Louise Barrett who talked on 



Baboon natural histories. She showed, with the example of didabots that 

complex behaviour can come from very simple mechanisms, and called for 

a more holistic view of primates, in order to understand how brain, body 

and world interact. We were reminded again of the difficulties of primate 

conservation and the ubiquity of the bushmeat trade during a spontaneously 

organised extra session in which several unedited films by the independent 

filmmaker Steve Jackson were shown. These disturbing films were made 

three weeks prior to the Congress at Libreville market in Gabon, and 

showed how openly bushmeat is sold there, despite the illegality of this 

31


trade. The films also showed how bush animals are used in traditional 

medicine, and showed government officials shopping for bushmeat, 

emphasizing the difficulty with developing policies to counter the bushmeat 

trade. Amongst the afternoon’s symposia was a collection of lectures on 



Hormonal studies of social and reproductive behaviour which included 

fascinating talks by Michael Heistermann, James Higham and Stuart 

Semple. 

 

We would like to take the opportunity to thank the organizers for such a 



successful event. We found it particularly enjoyable to see a good mixture 

of established primatologists, new researchers and students present their 

work.  

 

 



Nienke Alberts & Emily Lodge  

Roehampton University 

 

 

32



FUTURE MEETINGS 

 

 



PSGB Spring Meeting 2009 



 



“Form and Function” 



 



Thursday 16



th



 and Friday 17



th



 April 2009 



 



Bournemouth University, Landsdowne Campus, UK 



 



 



 



Call for abstracts 

This year’s spring meeting will be held at Bournemouth University 





The theme of the talks by invited speakers is "Form and Function", in which 

we will explore the links among morphology, behaviour and ecology. 

Members and non-members are invited to submit abstracts for poster and 

oral presentations on any topic of interest to PSGB members. We wish 

particularly to encourage postgraduate students and those early in their 

career to present, but anybody is welcome to submit an abstract (abstract 

deadline: 1 March 2009) to  



We will also have short skills sessions on topics that will be particularly 

useful for postgraduate students (e.g. "presentation skills", "introduction to 

morphometrics").We would like to encourage others to organise short 

workshops around the meeting - please contact the organisers if you would 

like to do so . 

 

Bournemouth University is hosting an associated public lecture by 

Prof. 



Emeritus Jan A.R.A.M. van Hooff

 from Utrecht University (early) 

Thursday evening. Prof. van Hooff (who is the scientific father of a long list 

of prominent primatologists) will discuss the evolution of and muscle 

involvement in the facial expressions of emotion, following in the footsteps 

of Charles Darwin’s work on this topic. 

 

Keynote speakers: 

•  

Prof. Robin Crompton,

 University of Liverpool, will talk about 

“Locomotor mechanics of the Laetoli Footprint Makers: evidence from 

experimental pedobarography and computer simulation”.

 

33


•  

Prof. Robin Dunbar,

 Oxford University, will talk about “Darwin, time 

and morphology: constraints on sociality in primates and their 

implications for evolution”.  

•  

Dr Sarah Elton

, HYMS Hull & University of York, will investigate 

the link between anatomy and ecology. 

•  

Prof. Gabriele Macho,

 University of Bradford, will present “Linking 

morphology, behaviour and ecology: how reliable are inferences from 

fragmentary hominin remains?” 

•  

Dr Todd C. Rae

, Roehampton University, will investigate the 

importance of phylogenetic relationships in studying anatomical 

adaptations. 

Marwell Zoo will allow meeting attendees to visit the zoo for free. We will 

organise a coach trip to Marwell Zoo on Saturday 18

th

 April at the cost of 



the coach.  

 

Registration rates:  



 Before After 



 1 



April 1 



April 

 

Full /Associate Member  



£35 

£40 


Full /Associate Non-Member 

£45  


£50 

Student/Concession Member  

£25 

£30 


Student/Concession Non-Member 

£35 


£40 

Excursion to Marwell Zoo  

£10  

£10 


 

Students presenting at the conference may apply for £50 student bursaries to 

attend this meeting. These will be available on a first come first served basis 

and subject to review of their submitted abstract. 

 

Please submit an abstract or send any suggestions to 



. Pre-registration and registration at the door will 

be available. 

 

Registration forms will appear on the website soon. 



34

Organisers:

 

The meeting is being organised by Dr 

Amanda Korstjens

, Conservation 

Sciences, Bournemouth University ; Dr 

Joanna 



Setchell, 

Anthropology, Durham University; and Dr 

Bridget Waller, 

Psychology, University of Portsmouth 

For the latest information and details on how to register, accommodation, 

etc. please visit .  

 

 



PSGB Winter Meeting 2009 



 



"Primate Stress: Causes, Responses and Consequences" 



 



Call for Papers 



 



Date 

1st to 2nd December 2009 



 



Venue 

Zoological Society of London, Meeting Rooms. ZSL, Regents Park, 

London. 

 

Organisers

 

Paul Honess (Oxford University) Contact: 
 

Stuart Semple (Roehampton University) 

Tessa Smith (University of Chester) 

 

Meeting Outline

 

The meeting will focus on aspects of stress in primates covering 

behavioural, physiological and neurological responses to stressors in the 

physical and social environment both in captivity and the wild. The 

consequences of these responses for the individual’s biological fitness will 

be assessed. The meeting will consist of a number of invited presentations 

as well as proffered papers spread, in themed sessions, over two days. There 

will also be one or more poster sessions. 

 

Call for Papers 

The organizers invite the submission of abstracts for oral (typically not 

exceeding 25-30 mins, including questions) and poster presentations 

covering research in all areas of primate stress, but in particular in those 

areas outlined above. All abstracts will be reviewed by at least two referees. 

Authors may be asked to present a poster rather than an oral paper. The 

35


organisers’ decisions on the inclusion of presentations in the programme 

will be final. 

 

Abstract Guidelines 

These guidelines are provided for general information, but are not intended 

to be prescriptive. As the abstracts will be published in Primate Eye and 

may be cited, they should summarize your work so that your study can be 

understood without additional information. 

 

The abstract must be submitted to 


as an 

MS 



Word

 document, written using 

10pt Arial font

 and include the following: 

 

•  

Preferred format

: Oral presentation / Poster presentation 



•  

Abstract title

•  

Names and institutional affiliation

 of presenting and any co-

authors.  

•  

Email address

 of corresponding author. 

•  

Keywords

: 4 maximum. 

•  

The body of the abstract

: a single block paragraph, maximum 250 

words.  

 

Use metric units of measurement, standard abbreviations and statistical 



symbols. Capitalise statistics (e.g. P < 0.05), but do not italicise. Give 

scientific names (italicised) for all species where a common name is used. 

Avoid including references. Please check spelling and grammar carefully 

and define all acronyms and non-standard abbreviations. 

 

Deadline for submission: 

Tuesday 30 June 2009

 

?


the-stories-about.html

the-story-of-alexander.html

the-story-of-robin-hood.html

the-story-of-the-song-the.html

the-strange-case-against.html